A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment Coursera Quiz Answers 2022 | All Weeks Assessment Answers [đź’ŻCorrect Answer]

Hello Peers, Today we are going to share all week’s assessment and quiz answers of the A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment Coursera course launched by Coursera totally free of costâś…âś…âś…. This is a certification course for every interested student.

In case you didn’t find this course for free, then you can apply for financial ads to get this course for totally free.

Check out this article “How to Apply for Financial Ads?”

About The Coursera

Coursera, India’s biggest learning platform launched millions of free courses for students daily. These courses are from various recognized universities, where industry experts and professors teach in a very well manner and in a more understandable way.


Here, you will find A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment Coursera Exam Answers in Bold Color which are given below.

These answers are updated recently and are 100% correctâś… answers of all week, assessment, and final exam answers of A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment Coursera from Coursera Free Certification Course.

Use â€śCtrl+F” To Find Any Questions Answer. & For Mobile User, You Just Need To Click On Three dots In Your Browser & You Will Get A â€śFind” Option There. Use These Option to Get Any Random Questions Answer.

About A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment Coursera Course

This course is based on an award-winning class taught at the Indian School of Business and at the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin. It was created by Prof. Raj Raghunathan (also known as “Dr. Happy-smarts”), who uses information from psychology, neuroscience, and behavioral decision theory to give students a tried-and-true recipe for living a happy and fulfilling life.

Course Apply Link – A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment Coursera

A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment Coursera Quiz Answers

Week 01: A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment Coursera Quiz Answers

Main Quiz 01

Q1 .Which of the following was NOT mentioned by Prof. Ed Diener (“Dr. Happiness”) as a reason why self-reports (of happiness) are a reliable measure of happiness:

  • Self-reported happiness is correlated with reaction times to good and bad things
  • Self-reported happiness is correlated with objectivity
  • Self-reported happiness is correlated with cortisol levels
  • Self-reported happiness is correlated with left-prefrontal activity

Q2 .In “Life Goals” surveys, happiness always emerges as a top goal. Which goal was it tied with in the survey that Prof. Raj conducted with Sunaina Chugani and Ashesh Mukherjee?

  • Great/Fulfilling Relationships
  • Physical Health
  • Career Success
  • None of the above

Q3 .Which of these refers to the “Fundamental Happiness Paradox”?

  • People rate happiness as a top priority and yet don’t act in happiness maximizing ways
  • Happiness is personal and subjective and yet, there is widespread agreement on what it means
  • The more feverishly you seek happiness, the more it eludes you
  • Things like need for superiority and need for control do increase happiness in the short-run—but not in the long-run

Q4 .In the “real-world” job-choice study with MBA students, which of the following findings rules out the possibility that the students chose the “extrinsically motivating” job because that’s the happiness-maximizing option?

  • The students preferred the intrinsically motivating job in “Stage 1” of the experiment (when they were not experiencing the stress of job interviews)
  • Preference for extrinsically motivating job was higher when using the projective technique
  • Students’ preferences were more in line with what one would expect from a materialistic culture
  • Amount of outstanding debt made no difference in preference for extrinsically motivating option

Q5 .Which of these is an example of the projective technique?

  • When you ask participants to guess how others would respond to a question
  • When you ask participants to guess how they would respond in the future to a situation
  • When you ask participants to guess how others would guess they (that is, the participants) would respond to a question
  • When you ask participants to respond to an artificial situation that they have never experienced before

Q6 .Which of the following was NOT discussed as a misconception that people harbor about happiness

  • Happiness leads to laziness
  • Happiness leads to selfishness
  • Happiness is fleeting
  • Happiness leads to delusion
  • Happiness leads to laziness
  • Happiness leads to selfishness
  • Happiness is fleeting
  • Happiness leads to delusion

Q7 .Barbara Fredrickson’s theory that happiness has a “broadening effect” explains which of the following phenomena the best:

  • Why happiness leads to longevity (i.e., to living longer)
  • Why happiness leads to better quality relationships
  • Why happiness leads to altruism
  • Why happiness leads to creativity (and to success)

Q8 .Which of the following statements is the closest approximation to “medium maximization”?

  • Money is only a tool – Ayn Rand
  • The lack of money is the root of all evil – Mark Twain
  • Money is what money does – unknown
  • There are people who have money and there are those who are rich – Coco Chanel

Q9 .The “fluency effect” is most closely related to which of the following reasons why we devalue happiness?

  • Medium maximization
  • Happiness is too abstract
  • We harbor misconceptions about happiness
  • None of the above

Q10 .Which of the following are the two components of the 1st happiness exercise?

  • Creating and storing happiness
  • Measuring and valuing happiness
  • Prioritize—but don’t pursue—happiness
  • Defining and incorporating happiness

Q11 .Why do we seek Superiority?

  • It makes us materialistic
  • Because it gives us confidence that we are making adequate progress towards goals (and towards mastery)
  • Being superior makes us disapprove of others
  • All of the above

Q12 .Which of the following reason(s) explain(s) why seeking superiority lowers happiness levels?

  • “Adaptation”
  • “Envy”
  • “Materialism”
  • All of the above

Q13 .Which of the following reasons explains why seeking superiority lowers chances of succeeding in intellectual/creative tasks but does not do so in more mechanical tasks?

  • It lights a fire under your backside
  • It leads to hubristic pride
  • It separates you from others
  • It takes away part of the brain’s processing capacity

Q14. According to the discussions in the video lectures, what is the one “pro” (or positive aspect) of the need for superiority from the perspective of someone who wishes to be productive/successful?

  • It makes the others respect you more (and they are therefore likely to obey you more, even if they don’t like you)
  • It makes you more motivated to set and pursue goals
  • It makes you feel envious, which can be a huge driver of creativity
  • It makes you aim high and those who aim high end up achieving more

Q15. In the video lectures, which of these was NOT discussed as a characteristic feature of flow?

  • Focus on the present (the next sub-goal or sub-sub-goal)
  • Paradoxical perception of time
  • Flow happens when one is least expecting it
  • Lack of self-consciousness

Q16. When is flow most likely?

  • When you are engaged in something that you have talent in and you like it
  • When you are engaged in something that you like, but may not have talent in
  • When you are engaged in something you have talent in, but may not like
  • When “required ability” is just above “available ability”

Q17. Which of these is a reason why flow enhances happiness?

  • Flow (10,000 hours or so of flow, to be precise) is a critical determinant of mastery
  • Flow makes you better liked by others
  • Flow moments are enjoyable
  • All of the above

Q18. According to Prof. Steven Tomlinson, to (re)gain a sense of fulfillment and happiness at work, you should do something that ideally lies at the intersection of which aspects?

  • What you are good at, and what the world needs
  • What you enjoy, what you are good at, what the world needs, and what you will be paid for
  • What you enjoy, and what you are good at
  • What the world needs, and what you will be paid for

Q19. Which of the following strategies comes closest to what Prof. Herminia Ibarra (author of Working Identity) recommends for getting flow back into your work life?

  • Wait till your children start earning the big bucks and ask them to get you a fulfilling job
  • Pursue hobbies that give you flow
  • Spend a few hours every week doing the thing that you find meaningful and take it from there
  • Quit your current job immediately and start doing what you find most meaningful (the more you delay, the more difficult it will be to find flow at work)

Q20. Prof. Sonja Lyubomirsky calls which of these a “meta strategy”?

  • Making happiness enhancing decisions
  • Self-compassion
  • Expressing gratitude
  • Being forgiving

Week 02: A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment Coursera Quiz Answers

Practice Quiz 01

Q1. Since there isn’t a direct way by which you can give yourself a score between 1 and 10 for the self-graded assignment #2 (expressing gratitude exercise), we have designed this rather roundabout way of doing so.

Below, you will find a list of 10 “questions” and two options for each question. Please check the 1st of these two options if you want to give yourself 1 point. You will get as many points as the number of 1st options you check.

So, if you believe that you deserve to get a score of 7 (out of 10) for this assignment, check the 1st option for 7 of the 10 questions below, and select the 2nd option for 3 of them.

Note that, whenever you check the 2nd option, you will receive feedback that your response was “incorrect.” Ignore this feedback. Like we said earlier, since there aren’t any options on Coursera (yet!) for self-grading, we had to invent this rather roundabout way of doing it!

Here’s how you would arrive at the score you deserve for this exercise:

The exercise can be thought to consist of 3 main components:

i. Writing the letter of gratitude

ii. Expressing the gratitude (i.e., emailing it, conveying it over phone or face-to-face), and

iii. Recording how one felt as a result

If you completed the 1st component, give yourself 5 points.

If you completed the 2nd component, give yourself another 3 points.

If you completed the 3rd component (even if you only did it on the discussion forum), give yourself another 2 points.

Final and very important note: You will need to check at least one of the 10 options for you to “pass” this assignment and continue with the course. So, even if you haven’t started this exercise (and don’t intend to complete it), give yourself a score of at least 1 point (or 10%) by checking the 1st option for one of the 10 questions.

Thanks, and if you happen to have any questions, please post them on the “assignments” link under the discussion forum.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I would not give myself any points for this question

Q2.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q3.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q4.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q5.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q6.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q7.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q8.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q9.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q10.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Practice Quiz 02

Q1. Which of the following was NOT mentioned by Prof. Ed Diener (“Dr. Happiness”) as a reason why self-reports (of happiness) are a reliable measure of happiness:

  • Self-reported happiness is correlated with reaction times to good and bad things
  • Self-reported happiness is correlated with left-prefrontal activity
  • Self-reported happiness is correlated with cortisol levels
  • Self-reported happiness is correlated with objectivity

Q2. In “Life Goals” surveys, happiness always emerges as a top goal. Which goal was it tied with in the survey that Prof. Raj conducted with Sunaina Chugani and Ashesh Mukherjee?

  • Great/Fulfilling Relationships
  • Physical Health
  • Career Success
  • None of the above

Q3. Which of these refers to the “Fundamental Happiness Paradox”?

  • Things like need for superiority and need for control do increase happiness in the short-run—but not in the long-run
  • Happiness is personal and subjective and yet, there is widespread agreement on what it means
  • People rate happiness as a top priority and yet don’t act in happiness maximizing ways
  • The more feverishly you seek happiness, the more it eludes you

Q4. In the “real-world” job-choice study with MBA students, which of the following findings rules out the possibility that the students chose the “extrinsically motivating” job because that’s the happiness-maximizing option?

  • Preference for extrinsically motivating job was higher when using the projective technique
  • Amount of outstanding debt made no difference in preference for extrinsically motivating option
  • The students preferred the intrinsically motivating job in “Stage 1” of the experiment (when they were not experiencing the stress of job interviews)
  • Students’ preferences were more in line with what one would expect from a materialistic culture

Q5. Which of these is an example of the projective technique?

  • When you ask participants to respond to an artificial situation that they have never experienced before
  • When you ask participants to guess how they would respond in the future to a situation
  • When you ask participants to guess how others would guess they (that is, the participants) would respond to a question
  • When you ask participants to guess how others would respond to a question

Q6. Which of the following was NOT discussed as a misconception that people harbor about happiness

  • Happiness leads to laziness
  • Happiness is fleeting
  • Happiness leads to delusion
  • Happiness leads to selfishness

Q7. Barbara Fredrickson’s theory that happiness has a “broadening effect” explains which of the following phenomena the best:

  • Why happiness leads to altruism
  • Why happiness leads to longevity (i.e., to living longer)
  • Why happiness leads to better quality relationships
  • Why happiness leads to creativity (and to success)

Q8. Which of the following statements is the closest approximation to “medium maximization”?

  • There are people who have money and there are those who are rich – Coco Chanel
  • Money is only a tool – Ayn Rand
  • Money is what money does – unknown
  • The lack of money is the root of all evil – Mark Twain

Q9. The “fluency effect” is most closely related to which of the following reasons why we devalue happiness?

  • Medium maximization
  • Happiness is too abstract
  • We harbor misconceptions about happiness
  • None of the above

Q10. Which of the following are the two components of the 1st happiness exercise?

  • Creating and storing happiness
  • Prioritize—but don’t pursue—happiness
  • Defining and incorporating happiness
  • Measuring and valuing happiness

Q11. Why do we seek Superiority?

  • It makes us materialistic
  • Because it gives us confidence that we are making adequate progress towards goals (and towards mastery)
  • Being superior makes us disapprove of others
  • All of the above

Q12. Which of the following reason(s) explain(s) why seeking superiority lowers happiness levels?

  • “Adaptation”
  • “Envy”
  • “Materialism”
  • All of the above

Q13. Which of the following reasons explains why seeking superiority lowers chances of succeeding in intellectual/creative tasks but does not do so in more mechanical tasks?

  • It takes away part of the brain’s processing capacity
  • It leads to hubristic pride
  • It separates you from others
  • It lights a fire under your backside

Q14. According to the discussions in the video lectures, what is the one “pro” (or positive aspect) of the need for superiority from the perspective of someone who wishes to be productive/successful?

  • It makes you more motivated to set and pursue goals
  • It makes you aim high and those who aim high end up achieving more
  • It makes you feel envious, which can be a huge driver of creativity
  • It makes the others respect you more (and they are therefore likely to obey you more, even if they don’t like you)

Q15. In the video lectures, which of these was NOT discussed as a characteristic feature of flow?

  • Flow happens when one is least expecting it
  • Paradoxical perception of time
  • Focus on the present (the next sub-goal or sub-sub-goal)
  • Lack of self-consciousness

Q16. When is flow most likely?

  • When “required ability” is just above “available ability”
  • When you are engaged in something that you have talent in and you like it
  • When you are engaged in something that you like, but may not have talent in
  • When you are engaged in something you have talent in, but may not like

Q17. Which of these is a reason why flow enhances happiness?

  • Flow moments are enjoyable
  • Flow (10,000 hours or so of flow, to be precise) is a critical determinant of mastery
  • Flow makes you better liked by others
  • All of the above

Q18. According to Prof. Steven Tomlinson, to (re)gain a sense of fulfillment and happiness at work, you should do something that ideally lies at the intersection of which aspects?

  • What you are good at, and what the world needs
  • What you enjoy, and what you are good at
  • What the world needs, and what you will be paid for
  • What you enjoy, what you are good at, what the world needs, and what you will be paid for

Q19. Which of the following strategies comes closest to what Prof. Herminia Ibarra (author of Working Identity) recommends for getting flow back into your work life?

  • Wait till your children start earning the big bucks and ask them to get you a fulfilling job
  • Spend a few hours every week doing the thing that you find meaningful and take it from there
  • Quit your current job immediately and start doing what you find most meaningful (the more you delay, the more difficult it will be to find flow at work)
  • Pursue hobbies that give you flow

Q20. Prof. Sonja Lyubomirsky calls which of these a “meta strategy”?

  • Expressing gratitude
  • Being forgiving
  • Self-compassion
  • Making happiness enhancing decisions

Week 03: A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment Coursera Quiz Answers

Q1. Since there isn’t a direct way by which you can give yourself a score between 1 and 10 for the self-graded assignment #2 (expressing gratitude exercise), we have designed this rather roundabout way of doing so.

Below, you will find a list of 10 “questions” and two options for each question. Please check the 1st of these two options if you want to give yourself 1 point. You will get as many points as the number of 1st options you check.

So, if you believe that you deserve to get a score of 7 (out of 10) for this assignment, check the 1st option for 7 of the 10 questions below, and select the 2nd option for 3 of them.

Note that, whenever you check the 2nd option, you will receive feedback that your response was “incorrect.” Ignore this feedback. Like we said earlier, since there aren’t any options on Coursera (yet!) for self-grading, we had to invent this rather roundabout way of doing it!

Here’s how you would arrive at the score you deserve for this exercise:

The exercise can be thought to consist of 3 main components:

i. Making a “healthy lifestyle” plan on the link to the exercise

ii. Doing one’s best to stick to one’s plan

iii. Answering questions (what was your plan? how well were you able to stick to it?, and what did you learn from this experience?) about the exercise.

If you completed the 1st component, give yourself 5 points.

If you completed the 2nd component, give yourself another 3 points.

If you completed the 3rd component (even if you only did it on the discussion forum), give yourself another 2 points.

Final and very important note: You will need to check at least one of the 10 options for you to “pass” this assignment and continue with the course. So, even if you haven’t started this exercise (and don’t intend to complete it), give yourself a score of at least 1 point (or 10%) by checking one of the 10 boxes.

Thanks, and if you happen to have any questions, please post them on the “assignments” link under the discussion forum.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q2.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q3.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q4.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q5.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q6.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q7.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q8.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q9.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q10 .

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Main Quiz

Q1. The experiments conducted by Harry Harlow showed that:

  • For baby monkeys, the need for love and nurturance is potentially even more important than is the need for food and nutrients
  • Baby monkeys reared on the wire mesh mother figure turned out to be far less “secure” than were those raised on the cloth mother figure
  • Orphans are likely to develop psychological problems if they are not provided “contact comfort”
  • Baby monkeys need as much love and nurturance as human babies do

Q2. Imagine that you are watching a sporting event in the presence of others. Extrapolating from the findings of Raghunathan and Corfman, in which of the following situations would your enjoyment be the greatest:

  • When your team won, and you were surrounded by others who did not support your team
  • When watching the game live as opposed to those watching it taped
  • When your team lost and you were surrounded by others who supported your team

Q3. The “scarcity principle” explains which of the following phenomena:

  • Why being needy lowers happiness
  • Why being secure leads to fulfilling relationships
  • Why exposure to words like “love” or “hugs” can temporarily boost relationship security
  • Why being avoidant lowers happiness

Q4. Which of the following needs explains why the idea of “going it alone” sounds very appealing:

  • The need for mastery
  • The need for belongingness
  • The need for autonomy
  • The need for superiority

Q5. Which of the following practices has the potential to lower neediness and avoidance and instill “secure attachment” in relationships?

  • Self-compassion
  • Expressing gratitude
  • Seeking the need to love (and give)
  • All of the above

Q6. What did the study conducted by Prof. Mike Norton and his colleagues (in which students who were given either $5 or $20 to spend on themselves vs. others) reveal?

  • Those from rich countries tend to derive a smaller boost in happiness levels from being given free money than those from poorer countries
  • Students who bought a toy for others were happier than those who bought them coffee
  • Those who spent money on others were happier than those who spent it on themselves
  • Those who were given $20 were happier than those who were given $5

Q7. Which of the following statements about the relationship between generosity and happiness at the country-level is true?

  • In 120 of the 136 countries, those who donated to charity were happier than those who didn’t
  • The effect of charity on happiness was similar to that of doubling household income
  • It’s not clear if charity enhances happiness or the other way around
  • All of the above

Q8. In the study involving “Gold fish,” which group of toddlers was the happiest?

  • Those who got to not just give a treat to the monkey, but also to pet it
  • Those who were asked to share one of their own treats with the monkey
  • Those who watched the experimenter give a treat to the monkey
  • Those who were asked to share the experimenter’s treats with the monkey

Q9. Which of the following was NOT mentioned as a reason why being loving and giving enhances happiness levels?

  • It’s our nature to be loving and giving; hence, being loving and giving enhances happiness
  • Being loving and giving makes us feel independent from others and this sense of independence enhances happiness
  • Being loving and giving sets up a positive reciprocity; others are loving and giving to us in return, which makes us happy
  • Being loving and giving makes us feel more capable and competent, which makes us feel good

Q10. Based on Reb Rebele’s description of Prof. Adam Grant (and others’ work) on reciprocity styles, which of the following groups of people are disproportionately represented at the top of organizations?

  • “Otherish” givers
  • “Selfless” givers
  • Takers
  • Matchers

Q11. Which of the following conclusions is best supported by the “cocaine study” (done with rats) and the study done with residents of the old age home?

  • Cocaine is superior to coca cola when it comes having a good time
  • If you want to feel uninhibited at a party, it’s best to drink copious quantities of alcohol
  • Even if you abused alcohol, you’d live longer if you were in control of when and how much to drink than if you weren’t in control of these decisions
  • After a certain age, it really doesn’t matter how much control you have over your decisions

Q12. â€śPsychological reactance” is closest to which of the following phenomena:

  • We love it when we are in control and hate it when we are not
  • We like and respect charismatic and persuasive leaders
  • We value things more when they are difficult to get
  • We resist others’ attempts to control us

Q13. Which of these was NOT discussed as a reason why being overly controlling of others or of external circumstances lowers happiness levels?

  • Being overly controlling makes one superstitious and this could potentially lower the quality of decisions we make
  • Being overly controlling can lead to higher risk taking, which jeopardizes the quality of decisions one makes
  • Those who are overly controlling are likely to get frustrated when things don’t go according to plan
  • Being overly controlling makes us dependent on others, leading eventually to neediness

Q14. External control enjoys which type of relationship with the internal control?

  • Multiplicative
  • Compensatory
  • Geometric
  • Additive

Q15. The idea that our expected enjoyment of vacations is often greater than our actual enjoyment of the vacation suggests that:

  • We are capable of empathizing with others, even if their life circumstances are totally different
  • We are doomed to never really enjoy vacations—so we should never go on them
  • We shouldn’t seek to control our vacations; we should just “go with the flow”
  • Our imaginations have a powerful impact on our feelings

Q16. With regard to taking personal responsibility for one’s own happiness, which of the following is the wrong question to ask (according to what was discussed in the video lectures)?

  • What if I can’t surrender myself to outcomes I can’t control?
  • Can I be happy if something extreme—like loss of a job or breaking a bone—happens?
  • Why does trusting others affect my happiness?
  • What if feeling sad is a natural part of life?

Q176. Which of these is a common misconception about “taking personal responsibility for your happiness”?

  • Taking personal responsibility for one’s happiness will lead others to take advantage of one
  • The best way to gain the ability to take personal responsibility for happiness is to practice with mundane negative events rather than with extreme ones
  • Taking personal responsibility means being happy all the time
  • It’s going to take a lot of time and effort to gain “personal mastery”

Q18. Which of the following is NOT a good tactic if you want to regulate your emotions:

  • Attention deployment
  • Labeling your emotions
  • Reinterpreting the event
  • Suppressing your emotions

Q19. In the study in which participants’ predicted versus actual happiness levels upon receiving a dollar was measured, results revealed that:

  • Participants predicted that their happiness levels would be higher if they did not get to know the reason for the free dollar, and this prediction was inaccurate
  • Participants predicted that their happiness levels would be higher if they came to know the reason for the free dollar, and this prediction was accurate
  • Participants predicted that their happiness levels would be higher if they did not come to know the reason for the free dollar, whereas, in reality, their happiness levels were higher when they did get to know the reason for receiving the free dollar
  • Participants predicted that their happiness levels would be higher if they came to know the reason for the free dollar, whereas, in reality, their happiness levels were higher when they did not get to know the reason for receiving the free dollar

Q20. Which of the following was NOT discussed as a finding in the lectures on “eating right, moving more, sleeping better?”

  • Almost everyone requires between 7 and 9 hours of sleep (per day-night cycle) in order to feel well-rested
  • Inactivity kills more people worldwide than does smoking
  • When your diet doesn’t have enough meat and protein, you look less attractive
  • For every hour that you spend idly in front of a TV after the age of 25 decrease life-expectancy by 22 minutes

Week 04: A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment Coursera Quiz Answers

Main Quiz 01

Q1. Since there isn’t a direct way by which you can give yourself a score between 1 and 10 for the self-graded assignment #2 (expressing gratitude exercise), we have designed this rather roundabout way of doing so.

Below, you will find a list of 3 “questions” and two options for each question. Please check the 1st of these three options if you want to give yourself 3.33 points. You will get as many points as the number of 1st options you check.

So, if you believe that you deserve to get a score of 6.67 (out of 10) for this assignment, check the 1st option for 2 of the 3 questions below, and select the 2nd option for the last question.

Note that, whenever you check the 2nd option, you will receive feedback that your response was “incorrect.” Ignore this feedback. Like we said earlier, since there aren’t any options on Coursera (yet!) for self-grading, we had to invent this rather roundabout way of doing it!

Here’s how you would arrive at the score you deserve for this exercise:

If you simply watched the “presence practice” video (Week 6 Video 10) from start to finish, but made no attempt to follow the instructions, give yourself 6.67 points.

If you watched the “presence practice” video (Week 6 Video 10) from start to finish, and followed the instructions (at least partially), given yourself 10 points.

Final and very important note: You will need to check at least one of the 3 options below for you to “pass” this assignment and continue with the course. So, even if you haven’t started this exercise (and don’t intend to complete it), give yourself a score of 3.33 points by checking one of the 2 boxes.

Thanks, and if you happen to have any questions, please post them on the “assignments” link under the discussion forum.

  • I would give myself 3.33 points out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q2.

I would give myself 3.33 points for this question

I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q3

  • I would give myself 3.34 points for this question
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Main Quiz 02

Q1. Since there isn’t a direct way by which you can give yourself a score between 1 and 10 for the self-graded assignment #2 (expressing gratitude exercise), we have designed this rather roundabout way of doing so.

Below, you will find a list of 10 “questions” and two options for each question. Please check the 1st of these two options if you want to give yourself 1 point. You will get as many points as the number of 1st options you check.

So, if you believe that you deserve to get a score of 7 (out of 10) for watching the course videos, check the 1st option for 7 of the 10 questions below, and select the 2nd option for 3 of them.

Note that, whenever you check the 2nd option, you will receive feedback that your response was “incorrect.” Ignore this feedback. Like we said earlier, since there aren’t any options on Coursera (yet!) for self-grading, we had to invent this rather roundabout way of doing it!

Here’s how you would arrive at the score you deserve for this exercise:

There are 9 modules in the course and you get 1 point for completing each module. Plus, you get 1 extra point for just completing this quiz (that’s how nice we are!)

So, for example, if you completed just module 1 (Course intro and happiness measurement) and nothing else, you would check the 1st option for this question and for question 2, which will give you 2 points. If you completed both module 1 and module 2 and nothing else, you would check the 1st option for this and the next 2 questions, which will give you 3 points and so on.

Final and very important note: You will need to check at least one of the 10 options for you to “pass” this assignment and continue with the course. So, even if you haven’t watched any of the videos, give yourself a score of at least 1 point (or 10%) by checking the 1st option for one of the 10 questions.

Thanks, and if you happen to have any questions, please post them on the “assignments” link under the discussion forum.

  • I give myself 1 point out of 1 for participating in this quiz
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q2.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 1
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q3.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 2
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q4

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 3
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q5.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 4
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q6.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 5
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q7.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 6
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q 8.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 7
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q9.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 8
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Q10.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 9
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

Main Quiz 03

Q1. In the “wallet drop study” (conducted by the Toronto Star) what was the main measure of interest?

  • Whether the wallet was returned
  • How expensive stolen wallets are
  • Amount of money that was taken
  • The missing credit cards

Q2. In the “trust game” study conducted by the Swiss researchers, which of the following proportion of participants is closest to the number who returned the money if they were trusted with the $10?

  • 44%
  • 10%
  • 66%
  • 95%

Q3. One of the main reasons why it is difficult to proactively trust others is because:

  • People are less trustworthy than we perceive them to be
  • There is little to be gained from proactively trusting others
  • There are lots of hidden costs of being proactively trusting
  • We are hardwired to distrust others, particularly strangers

Q4. Which of the following is NOT a hidden benefit of being proactively trusting of others?

  • Building a community of trustworthy relationships
  • Feeling good when one’s trust is reciprocated
  • Contributing to society’s upliftment
  • All of the above are hidden benefits of being proactively trusting

Q5. Which of the following was NOT discussed as a strategy for mitigating the psychological pain of being cheated?

  • Forgiveness
  • Holding those who cheat accountable for their action
  • Reminding oneself that trust begets trustworthiness
  • Recognizing that if those who are materially well off aren’t willing to do their bit to enhance trust levels in society, then we can’t really expect those who are worse off to play that role

Q6. William Blake’s quote “Joy and woe are woven fine” best captures which of the following “facts” about life:

  • It’s difficult to control life’s outcomes
  • Those of a spiritual bent are happier than those who aren’t
  • It’s difficult to categorize outcomes as unambiguously “good” or “bad”
  • Happy people, in general, tend to do better in life than their less-happy counterparts

Q7. The “need to be busy” studies, along with studies on flow indicate that:

  • We don’t need to rely on outcomes for our happiness
  • Both outcomes and processes are important determinants of happiness
  • Outcomes are a much more significant determinant of happiness than are processes
  • It’s best not to rely on either outcomes or processes for happiness

Q8. The dispassionate pursuit of passion is difficult because:

  • Being dispassionate about something means having no curiosity or interest in life
  • It’s difficult to have no desires
  • It’s difficult to change one’s mind about outcomes before they occur versus after (due to the need for consistency)
  • d. All of the above

Q9. Which of the following was NOT discussed as a strategy for instilling the dispassionate pursuit of passion?

  • Reminiscing about past negative events and recognizing that, if we could change our minds about them, there’s a good chance we’ll change our minds about current negative events
  • Gratitude
  • “Three good things with a twist”
  • Self-compassion

Q10. Based on the placebo effects findings, one could conclude that the following belief is the most scientifically valid:

  • Life is benign
  • Life is malign
  • Life is indifferent
  • None of the above beliefs about life is any more scientifically valid than the other

Q11. Which of the following was NOT a finding that emerged from Matt Killingworth’s (and his colleague’s) studies on mindfulness?

  • The best way to not let the mind wander is to distance oneself from one’s “GATEs” (Goals, Actions/Action tendencies, Thoughts, and Emotions)
  • People’s minds wander least when they are having sex
  • Incredibly, even if experiencing something negative, people are happier (or less unhappy) when their minds don’t wander than when they do
  • People’s minds wander a LOT—roughly 50% of the time

Q11. Which of these is NOT likely to be a consequence of practising mindfulness?

  • The pace at which one’s mind lurches from one element of the GATE to the other slows down
  • One becomes more “present oriented”
  • Attentional blink increases
  • All of the above

Q13. The practice of mindfulness results in cortical:

  • Weakening
  • Broadening
  • Emancipation
  • Thickening

Q14. According to Prof. Shauna Shapiro, one of the most “hopeful” and “optimistic” themes that emerge from the studies on mindfulness is that the practice can:

  1. Reverse aging
  2. Help get rid of the “cobwebs” in one’s brain
  3. Help overcome relationship stress
  4. Help overcome the happiness “set point”

Q15. According to the discussions in the video lectures, which of these was explicitly mentioned as a misconception about mindfulness that prevents people from taking up the practice?

  • That it will make one overly scientific and analytical
  • That it will lead one to become soft and weak
  • That it will kill creativity
  • That it will lead to not experiencing moments of pure joy and exhilaration

Q16. According to Prof. Richie Davidson, the goal in mindfulness is to:

  • Think only kind and compassionate thoughts
  • Change one’s relationship with thoughts
  • Treat thoughts as a type of feeling
  • Completely stop thinking

Q17. According to Prof. Richie Davidson, one of the best ways to overcome the frustration from practising mindfulness is to:

  • Concentrate on the “third eye”—the region between the eyebrows
  • Start with very short—1 to 2 minute—daily practice
  • Start chanting a favorite “mantra” whenever you feel bored
  • Focus only on the positive consequences of mindfulness and ignore the negative ones

Q18. Chade Meng Tan uses the metaphor of riding a __________ to help understand how to practise mindfulness:

  • Airplane
  • Cobra
  • Wave
  • Bicycl

Q19. According to Steven Pressfield, one way to overcome the internal “resistance” is by:

  • Practising mindfulness, of course!
  • “Turning pro”
  • Finding a coach
  • Practising in groups

Q20. According to the “two approaches to MBA” framework, which of the following is the “5th determinant of happiness”?

  • Basic necessities
  • MBA (Mastery, Belongingness, and Autonomy)
  • MBA (Masters in Business Administration)
  • The “abundance” (vs. “scarcity”) route to MBA (Mastery, Belongingness, and Autonomy)

More About This Course

What are the things that make life happy and full?

This has to be one of the most important questions in life, and it’s one that many of our ancestors have thought about. Buddha is known for giving up his kingdom to find happiness. Aristotle, Epicurus, Plato, and Socrates were all Greek philosophers who had their own ideas about what makes people happy. And we all have our own ideas about what makes us happy.

How true are our ideas?

Until recently, the only way to find an answer to this question was to talk to religious leaders. Or, if you were lucky, you could have based it on late-night talks with friends and family, which might have been fueled by alcohol. All of that has changed, which is good. In the past 15 years, scientists have really stepped up their game. We now have a pretty good idea of what it takes to live a happy and fulfilling life.

This course is based on an award-winning class taught at the Indian School of Business and at the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin. It was created by Prof. Raj Raghunathan (also known as “Dr. Happy-smarts”), who uses information from psychology, neuroscience, and behavioural decision theory to give students a tried-and-true recipe for living a happy and fulfilling life.

Even though it’s not required, you might want to read Prof. Raj’s upcoming book, If you’re so smart, why aren’t you happy? can help you review and learn the information in this book when you have time.

Only Coursera students can get a 50% discount on the hardcover version of the book, plus shipping and handling. If you write to Aaron at [email protected], you can get 50% off the hardcover. Please say in your email that you are taking the “Coursera happiness course.”

Several well-known thinkers, such as Dan Ariely (author of Predictably Irrational and the soon-to-be-published Irrationally Yours), Ed Diener (also known as “Dr. Happiness”), and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, will be on the course (author of Flow),

If you take this course, you will learn the answers to questions like: Why aren’t smart, successful people as happy as they could or should be?
What are the “Seven Deadly Sins of Happiness” that even smart and successful people do?
, and – What are the “7 Habits of the Highly Happy” and how can you use them in your life?

I expect that by the end of the course, students who have worked hard on the lectures and exercises will not only know more about the science of happiness, but they will also be much happier.

SKILLS YOU WILL GAIN

  • Gratitude
  • Mindfulness
  • Happiness
  • Meditation

Conclusion

Hopefully, this article will be useful for you to find all the Week, final assessment, and Peer Graded Assessment Answers of A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment Coursera Quiz of Coursera and grab some premium knowledge with less effort. If this article really helped you in any way then make sure to share it with your friends on social media and let them also know about this amazing training. You can also check out our other course Answers. So, be with us guys we will share a lot more free courses and their exam/quiz solutions also, and follow our Techno-RJ Blog for more updates.

Leave a Comment

Ads Blocker Image Powered by Code Help Pro

Ads Blocker Detected!!!

We have detected that you are using extensions to block ads. Please support us by disabling these ads blocker.

Powered By
Best Wordpress Adblock Detecting Plugin | CHP Adblock