LinkedIn Skill Assessment | R Programming Assessment Answers 2021

Hello LinkedIn Users, Today we are going to share LinkedIn R Programming Assessment Answers. So, if you are a LinkedIn user, then you must give Skill Assessment Test. This Assessment Skill Test in LinkedIn is totally free and after completion of Assessment, you’ll earn a verified LinkedIn Skill Badge🥇 that will display on your profile and will help you in getting hired by recruiters.

Who can give this Skill Assessment Test?

Any LinkedIn User-

  • Wants to increase chances for getting hire,
  • Wants to Earn LinkedIn Skill Badge🥇🥇,
  • Wants to rank their LinkedIn Profile,
  • Wants to improve their Programming Skills,
  • Anyone interested in improving their whiteboard coding skill,
  • Anyone who wants to become a Software Engineer, SDE, Data Scientist, Machine Learning Engineer etc.,
  • Any students who want to start a career in Data Science,
  • Students who have at least high school knowledge in math and who want to start learning data structures,
  • Any self-taught programmer who missed out on a computer science degree.

Here, you will find R Programming Quiz Answers in Bold Color which are given below. These answers are updated recently and are 100% correct✅ answers of LinkedIn R Programming Skill Assessment.

69% of professionals think verified skills are more important than college education. And 89% of hirers said they think skill assessments are an essential part of evaluating candidates for a job.

Use “Ctrl+F” To Find Any Questions Answer. & For Mobile User You Just Need To Click On Three dots In Your Browser & You Will Get A “Find” Option There. Use These Option to Get Any Random Questions Answer.

LinkedIn R Programming Assessment

Q1. How does a matrix differ from a data frame?

  •  A matrix may contain numeric values only.
  •  A matrix must not be singular.
  •  A data frame may contain variables that have different modes.
  •  A data frame may contain variables of different lengths.

Q2. What value does this statement return?
unclass(as.Date(“1971-01-01”))

  •  1
  •  365
  •  4
  •  12

Q3. What do you use to take an object such as a data frame out of the workspace?

  •  remove()
  •  erase()
  •  detach()
  •  delete()

Q4. Review the following code. What is the result of line 3?
xvect<-c(1,2,3)xvect[2] <- “2”xvect

  •  [1] 1 2 3
  •  [1] “1” 2 “3”
  •  [1] “1” “2” “3”
  •  [1] 7 9

Q5. The variable height is a numeric vector in the code below. Which statement returns the value 35?

  •  height(length(height))
  •  height[length(height)]
  •  height[length[height]]
  •  height(5)

Q6. In the image below, the data frame is named rates. The statement sd(rates[, 2]) returns 39. As what does R regard Ellen’s product ratings?

R Programming Language Assessment LinkedIn Answers
  •  sample with replacement
  •  population
  •  trimmed sample
  •  sample <– not sure

Q7. Which choice does R regard as an acceptable name for a variable?

  •  Var_A!
  •  \_VarA
  •  .2Var_A
  •  Var2_A

Q8. What is the principal difference between an array and a matrix?

  •  A matrix has two dimensions, while an array can have three or more dimensions.
  •  An array is a subtype of the data frame, while a matrix is a separate type entirely.
  •  A matrix can have columns of different lengths, but an array’s columns must all be the same length.
  •  A matrix may contain numeric values only, while an array can mix different types of values.

Q9. Which is not a property of lists and vectors?

  •  type
  •  length
  •  attributes
  •  scalar

Q10. In the image below, the data frame on lines 1 through 4 is names StDf. State and Capital are both factors. Which statement returns the results shown on lines 6 and 7?

LinkedIn R Programming Quiz Answers
  •  StDf[1:2,-3]
  •  StDf[1:2,1]
  •  StDf[1:2,]
  •  StDf[1,2,]

Q11. Which function displays the first five rows of the data frame named pizza?

  •  BOF(pizza, 5)
  •  first(pizza, 5)
  •  top(pizza, 5)
  •  head(pizza, 5)

Q12. You accidentally display a large data frame on the R console, losing all the statements you entered during the current session. What is the best way to get the prior 25 statements back?

  •  console(-25)
  •  console(reverse=TRUE)
  •  history()
  •  history(max.show = 25)

Q13. d.pizza is a data frame. It’s column named temperature contains only numbers. If u extract temperature using the [] accessors, its class defaults to numeric. How can you access temperature so that it retains the class of data.frame?
> class( d.pizza[ , “temperature” ] )> “numeric”

  •  class( d.pizza( , “temperature” ) )
  •  class( d.pizza[ , “temperature” ] )
  •  class( d.pizza$temperature )
  •  class( d.pizza[ , “temperature”, drop=F ] )

Q14. What does c contain?
a <- c(3,3,6.5,8)b <- c(7,2,5.5,10)c <- a < b

  •  [1] NaN
  •  [1] -4
  •  [1] 4 -1 -1 2
  •  [1] TRUE FALSE FALSE TRUE

Q15. Review the statements below. Does the use of the dim function change the class of y, and if so what is y’s new class?
> y <- 1:9> dim(y) <- c(3,3)

  •  No, y’s new class is “array”.
  •  Yes, y’s new class is “matrix”.
  •  No, y’s new class is “vector”.
  •  Yes, y’s new class is “integer”.

Q16. What is mydf$y in this code?
mydf <- data.frame(x=1:3, y=c(“a”,”b”,”c”), stringAsFactors=FALSE)

  •  list
  •  string
  •  factor
  •  character vector

Q17. How does a vector differ from a list?

  •  Vectors are used only for numeric data, while list are useful for both numeric and string data.
  •  Vectors and lists are the same thing and can be used interchangeably.
  •  A vector contains items of a single data type, while a list can contain items of different data types.
  •  Vectors are like arrays, while lists are like data frames.

Q18. What statement shows the objects on your workspace?

  •  list.objects()
  •  print.objects()
  •  getws()
  •  ls()

Q19. What function joins two or more column vectors to form a data frame?

  •  rbind()
  •  cbind()
  •  bind()
  •  coerce()

Q20. Review line 1 below. What does the statement in line 2 return?
1 mylist <- list(1,2,”C”,4,5)2 unlist(mylist)

  •  [1] 1 2 4 5
  •  “C”
  •  [1] “1” “2” “C” “4” “5”
  •  [1] 1 2 C 4 5

Q21. What is the value of y in this code?
x <- NAy <- x/1

  •  Inf
  •  Null
  •  NaN
  •  NA

Q22. Two variable in the mydata data frame are named Var1 and Var2. How do you tell a bivariate function, such as cor.test, which two variables you want to analyze?

  •  cor.test(Var1 ~ Var2)
  •  cor.test(mydata$(Var1,Var2))
  •  cor.test(mydata$Var1,mydata$Var2)
  •  cor.test(Var1,Var2, mydata)

Q23. A data frame named d.pizza is part of the DescTools package. A statement is missing from the following R code and an error is therefore likely to occur. Which statement is missing?
library(DescTools)deliver <- aggregate(count,by=list(area,driver), FUN=mean)
print(deliver)

  •  attach(d.pizza)
  •  summarize(deliver)
  •  mean <- rbind(d.pizza,count)
  •  deliver[!complete.cases(deliver),]

Q24. How to name rows and columns in DataFrames and Matrices F in R?

  •  data frame: names() and rownames() matrix: colnames() and row.names()
  •  data frame: names() and row.names() matrix: dimnames() (not sure)
  •  data frame: colnames() and row.names() matrix: names() and rownames()
  •  data frame: colnames() and rownames() matrix: names() and row.names()

Q25. Which set of two statements-followed by the cbind() function-results in a data frame named vbound?

  • [ ] v1<-list(1,2,3)
    v2<-list(c(4,5,6))
    vbound<-cbind(v1,v2)
  • [ ] v1<-c(1,2,3)
    v2<-list(4,5,6))
    vbound<-cbind(v1,v2)
  • [ ] v1<-c(1,2,3)
    v2<-c(4,5,6))
    vbound<-cbind(v1,v2)

Q26. ournames is a character vector. What values does the statement below return to Cpeople?Cpeople <- ournames %in% grep(“^C”, ournames, value=TRUE)

  •  records where the first character is a C
  •  any record with a value containing a C
  •  TRUE or FALSE, depending on whether any character in ournames is C
  •  TRUE or FALSE values, depending on whether the first character in an ournames record is C

Q27. What is the value of names(v[4])?v <- 1:3names(v) <- c(“a”, “b”, “c”)
v[4] <- 4

  •  “”
  •  d
  •  NULL
  •  NA

Q28. Which of the following statements doesn’t yield the code output below. Review the following code. What is the result of line 3?
x <- c(1, 2, 3, 4)Output: [1] 2 3 4

  •  x[c(2, 3, 4)]
  •  x[-1]
  •  x[c(-1, 0, 0, 0)]
  •  x[c(-1, 2, 3, 4)]

Q29. Given DFMerged <- merge(DF1, DF2) and the image below, how manu rows are in DFMerged?
DF1(data frame 1): DF2(data frame 2):VarA VarB VarA VarD
1 1 2 1 18 212 4 5 2 19 223 7 8 3 20 23

  •  6
  •  9
  •  3
  •  0

Conclusion

Hopefully, this article will be useful for you to find all the Answers of R Skill Assessment available on LinkedIn for free and grab some premium knowledge with less effort. If this article really helped you in any way then make sure to share it with your friends on social media and let them also know about this amazing Skill Assessment Test. You can also check out our other course Answers. So, be with us guys we will share a lot more free courses and their exam/quiz solutions also and follow our Techno-RJ Blog for more updates.

FAQs

Is this Skill Assessment Test is free?

Yes R Programming Assessment Quiz is totally free on LinkedIn for you. The only thing is needed i.e. your dedication towards learning.

When I will get Skill Badge?

Yes, if will Pass the Skill Assessment Test, then you will earn a skill badge that will reflect in your LinkedIn profile. For passing in LinkedIn Skill Assessment, you must score 70% or higher, then only you will get you skill badge.

How to participate in skill quiz assessment?

It’s good practice to update and tweak your LinkedIn profile every few months. After all, life is dynamic and (I hope) you’re always learning new skills. You will notice a button under the “Skills & Endorsements” tab within your LinkedIn Profile: ‘Take skill quiz.‘ Upon clicking, you will choose your desire skill test quiz and complete your assessment.

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