Structuring Machine Learning Projects Coursera Quiz Answers 2022 | All Weeks Assessment Answers [💯Correct Answer]

Hello Peers, Today we are going to share all week’s assessment and quiz answers of the Structuring Machine Learning Projects Coursera course launched by Coursera totally free of cost✅✅✅. This is a certification course for every interested student.

In case you didn’t find this course for free, then you can apply for financial ads to get this course for totally free.

Check out this article “How to Apply for Financial Ads?”

About The Coursera

Coursera, India’s biggest learning platform launched millions of free courses for students daily. These courses are from various recognized universities, where industry experts and professors teach in a very well manner and in a more understandable way.


Here, you will find Structuring Machine Learning Projects Coursera Exam Answers in Bold Color which are given below.

These answers are updated recently and are 100% correct✅ answers of all week, assessment, and final exam answers of Structuring Machine Learning Projects Coursera from Coursera Free Certification Course.

Use “Ctrl+F” To Find Any Questions Answer. & For Mobile User, You Just Need To Click On Three dots In Your Browser & You Will Get A “Find” Option There. Use These Option to Get Any Random Questions Answer.

About Structuring Machine Learning Projects Coursera Course

In the third Deep Learning Specialization course, you’ll learn how to design a successful machine learning project and practice decision-making.

Course Apply Link – Structuring Machine Learning Projects Coursera

Structuring Machine Learning Projects Coursera Quiz Answers

Structuring Machine Learning Projects Week 1 Quiz Answers

Q1. Problem Statement

This example is adapted from a real production application, but with details disguised to protect confidentiality.

You are a famous researcher in the City of Peacetopia. The people of Peacetopia have a common characteristic: they are afraid of birds. To save them, you have to build an algorithm that will detect any bird flying overPeacetopia and alert the population.

The City Council gives you a dataset of 10,000,000 images of the sky above Peacetopia, taken from the city’s security cameras. They are labelled:

  1. y = 0: There is no bird on the image
  2. y = 1: There is a bird on the image

Your goal is to build an algorithm able to classify new images taken by security cameras from Peacetopia.

There are a lot of decisions to make:

  1. What is the evaluation metric?
  2. How do you structure your data into train/dev/test sets?

Metric of success

The City Council tells you that they want an algorithm that

  1. Has high accuracy
  2. Runs quickly and takes only a short time to classify a new image.
  3. Can fit in a small amount of memory, so that it can run in a small processor that the city will attach to many different security cameras.

Note: Having three evaluation metrics makes it harder for you to quickly choose between two different algorithms, and will slow down the speed with which your team can iterate. True/False?

  • True
  • False

Q2. After further discussions, the city narrows down its criteria to:

  1. “We need an algorithm that can let us know a bird is flying over Peacetopia as accurately as possible.”
  2. “We want the trained model to take no more than 10sec to classify a new image.”
  3. “We want the model to fit in 10MB of memory.”

If you had the three following models, which one would you choose?

  • A
Test AccuracyRuntimeMemory size
97%1 sec3MB
  • B
Test AccuracyRuntimeMemory size
98%9 sec9MB
  • C
Test AccuracyRuntimeMemory size
97%3 sec2MB
  • D
Test AccuracyRuntimeMemory size
99%13 sec9MB

Q3. Based on the city’s requests, which of the following would you say is true?

  • Accuracy, running time and memory size are all satisficing metrics because you have to do sufficiently well on all three for your system to be acceptable.
  • Accuracy is a satisficing metric; running time and memory size are an optimizing metric.
  • Accuracy, running time and memory size are all optimizing metrics because you want to do well on all three.
  • Accuracy is an optimizing metric; running time and memory size are a satisficing metrics.

Q4. Structuring your data

Before implementing your algorithm, you need to split your data into train/dev/test sets. Which of these do you think is the best choice?

  • A
TrainDevTest
3,333,3343,333,3333,333,333
  • B
TrainDevTest
9,500,000250,000250,000
  • C
TrainDevTest
6,000,0001,000,0003,000,000
  • D
TrainDevTest
6,000,0003,000,0001,000,000

Q5. After setting up your train/dev/test sets, the City Council comes across another 1,000,000 images, called the “citizens’ data”. Apparently the citizens of Peacetopia are so scared of birds that they volunteered to take pictures of the sky and label them, thus contributing these additional 1,000,000 images. These images are different from the distribution of images the City Council had originally given you, but you think it could help your algorithm.

Notice that adding this additional data to the training set will make the distribution of the training set different from the distributions of the dev and test sets.

Is the following statement true or false?

“You should not add the citizens’ data to the training set, because if the training distribution is different from the dev and test sets, then this will not allow the model to perform well on the test set.”

  • True
  • False

Q6. One member of the City Council knows a little about machine learning, and thinks you should add the 1,000,000 citizens’ data images to the test set. You object because:

  • This would cause the dev and test set distributions to become different. This is a bad idea because you’re not aiming where you want to hit.
  • The test set no longer reflects the distribution of data (security cameras) you most care about.
  • The 1,000,000 citizens’ data images do not have a consistent x–>y mapping as the rest of the data (similar to the New York City/Detroit housing prices example from lecture).
  • A bigger test set will slow down the speed of iterating because of the computational expense of evaluating models on the test set.

Q7. You train a system, and its errors are as follows (error = 100%-Accuracy):

Training set error4.0%
Dev set error4.5%

This suggests that one good avenue for improving performance is to train a bigger network so as to drive down the 4.0% training error. Do you agree?

  • No, because this shows your variance is higher than your bias.
  • Yes, because this shows your bias is higher than your variance.
  • Yes, because having 4.0% training error shows you have a high bias.
  • No, because there is insufficient information to tell.

Q8. You ask a few people to label the dataset so as to find out what is human-level performance. You find the following levels of accuracy:

Bird watching expert #10.3% error
Bird watching expert #20.5% error
Normal person #1 (not a bird watching expert)1.0% error
Normal person #2 (not a bird watching expert)1.2% error

If your goal is to have “human-level performance” be a proxy (or estimate) for Bayes error, how would you define “human-level performance”?

  • 0.3% (accuracy of expert #1)
  • 0.4% (average of 0.3 and 0.5)
  • 0.0% (because it is impossible to do better than this)
  • 0.75% (average of all four numbers above)

Q9. Which of the following statements do you agree with?

  • A learning algorithm’s performance can be better than human-level performance and better than Bayes error.
  • A learning algorithm’s performance can be better than human-level performance but it can never be better than Bayes error.
  • A learning algorithm’s performance can never be better than human-level performance but it can be better than Bayes error.
  • A learning algorithm’s performance can never be better than human-level performance nor better than Bayes error.

Q10. You find that a team of ornithologists debating and discussing an image gets an even better 0.1% performance, so you define that as “human-level performance.” After working further on your algorithm, you end up with the following:

Human-level performance0.1%
Training set error2.0%
Dev set error2.1%

Based on the evidence you have, which two of the following four options seem the most promising to try? (Check two options.)

  • Try decreasing regularization.
  • Get a bigger training set to reduce variance.
  • Try increasing regularization.
  • Train a bigger model to try to do better on the training set.

Q11. You also evaluate your model on the test set, and find the following:

Human-level performance0.1%
Training set error2.0%
Dev set error2.1%
Test set error7.0%

What does this mean? (Check the two best options.)

  • You should try to get a bigger dev set.
  • You should get a bigger test set.
  • You have underfit to the dev set.
  • You have overfit to the dev set.

Q12. After working on this project for a year, you finally achieve:

Human-level performance0.10%
Training set error0.05%
Dev set error0.05%

What can you conclude? (Check all that apply.)

  • With only 0.09% further progress to make, you should quickly be able to close the remaining gap to 0%
  • This is a statistical anomaly (or must be the result of statistical noise) since it should not be possible to surpass human-level performance.
  • It is now harder to measure avoidable bias, thus progress will be slower going forward.
  • If the test set is big enough for the 0.05% error estimate to be accurate, this implies Bayes error is ≤0.05

Q13. It turns out Peacetopia has hired one of your competitors to build a system as well. Your system and your competitor both deliver systems with about the same running time and memory size. However, your system has higher accuracy! However, when Peacetopia tries out your and your competitor’s systems, they conclude they actually like your competitor’s system better, because even though you have higher overall accuracy, you have more false negatives (failing to raise an alarm when a bird is in the air). What should you do?

  • Pick false negative rate as the new metric, and use this new metric to drive all further development.
  • Look at all the models you’ve developed during the development process and find the one with the lowest false negative error rate.
  • Rethink the appropriate metric for this task, and ask your team to tune to the new metric.
  • Ask your team to take into account both accuracy and false negative rate during development.

Q14. You’ve handily beaten your competitor, and your system is now deployed in Peacetopia and is protecting the citizens from birds! But over the last few months, a new species of bird has been slowly migrating into the area, so the performance of your system slowly degrades because your data is being tested on a new type of data.

You have only 1,000 images of the new species of bird. The city expects a better system from you within the next 3 months. Which of these should you do first?

  • Try data augmentation/data synthesis to get more images of the new type of bird.
  • Use the data you have to define a new evaluation metric (using a new dev/test set) taking into account the new species, and use that to drive further progress for your team.
  • Put the 1,000 images into the training set so as to try to do better on these birds.
  • D: Add the 1,000 images into your dataset and reshuffle into a new train/dev/test split.

Q15. The City Council thinks that having more Cats in the city would help scare off birds. They are so happy with your work on the Bird detector that they also hire you to build a Cat detector. (Wow Cat detectors are just incredibly useful aren’t they.) Because of years of working on Cat detectors, you have such a huge dataset of 100,000,000 cat images that training on this data takes about two weeks. Which of the statements do you agree with? (Check all that agree.)

  • Having built a good Bird detector, you should be able to take the same model and hyperparameters and just apply it to the Cat dataset, so there is no need to iterate.
  • If 100,000,000 examples is enough to build a good enough Cat detector, you might be better off training with just 10,000,000 examples to gain a \approx≈10x improvement in how quickly you can run experiments, even if each model performs a bit worse because it’s trained on less data.
  • Buying faster computers could speed up your teams’ iteration speed and thus your team’s productivity.
  • Needing two weeks to train will limit the speed at which you can iterate.

Structuring Machine Learning Projects Week 2 Quiz Answers

Q1. To help you practice strategies for machine learning, in this week we’ll present another scenario and ask how you would act. We think this “simulator” of working in a machine learning project will give a task of what leading a machine learning project could be like!

You are employed by a startup building self-driving cars. You are in charge of detecting road signs (stop sign, pedestrian crossing sign, construction ahead sign) and traffic signals (red and green lights) in images. The goal is to recognize which of these objects appear in each image. As an example, the above image contains a pedestrian crossing sign and red traffic lights

Your 100,000 labeled images are taken using the front-facing camera of your car. This is also the distribution of data you care most about doing well on. You think you might be able to get a much larger dataset off the internet, that could be helpful for training even if the distribution of internet data is not the same.

You are just getting started on this project. What is the first thing you do? Assume each of the steps below would take about an equal amount of time (a few days).

  • Spend a few days collecting more data using the front-facing camera of your car, to better understand how much data per unit time you can collect.
  • Spend a few days checking what is human-level performance for these tasks so that you can get an accurate estimate of Bayes error.
  • Spend a few days training a basic model and see what mistakes it makes.
  • Spend a few days getting the internet data, so that you understand better what data is available.

Q2. Your goal is to detect road signs (stop sign, pedestrian crossing sign, construction ahead sign) and traffic signals (red and green lights) in images. The goal is to recognize which of these objects appear in each image. You plan to use a deep neural network with ReLU units in the hidden layers.

For the output layer, a softmax activation would be a good choice for the output layer because this is a multi-task learning problem. True/False?

  • False
  • True

Q3. You are carrying out error analysis and counting up what errors the algorithm makes. Which of these datasets do you think you should manually go through and carefully examine, one image at a time?

  • 500 randomly chosen images
  • 10,000 images on which the algorithm made a mistake
  • 500 images on which the algorithm made a mistake
  • 10,000 randomly chosen images

Q4. After working on the data for several weeks, your team ends up with the following data:

100,000 labeled images taken using the front-facing camera of your car.

900,000 labeled images of roads downloaded from the internet.

Each image’s labels precisely indicate the presence of any specific road signs and traffic signals or combinations of them. For example, y(i) = [1 0 0 1 0]

means the image contains a stop sign and a red traffic light.

Because this is a multi-task learning problem, you need to have all your y^(i)
vectors fully labeled. If one example is equal to[0 ? 1 1 ?] 
then the learning algorithm will not be able to use that example. True/False?

  • True
  • False

Q5. The distribution of data you care about contains images from your car’s front-facing camera; which comes from a different distribution than the images you were able to find and download off the internet. How should you split the dataset into train/dev/test sets?

  • Choose the training set to be the 900,000 images from the internet along with 80,000 images from your car’s front-facing camera. The 20,000 remaining images will be split equally in dev and test sets.
  • Choose the training set to be the 900,000 images from the internet along with 20,000 images from your car’s front-facing camera. The 80,000 remaining images will be split equally in dev and test sets.
  • Mix all the 100,000 images with the 900,000 images you found online. Shuffle everything. Split the 1,000,000 images dataset into 600,000 for the training set, 200,000 for the dev set and 200,000 for the test set.
  • Mix all the 100,000 images with the 900,000 images you found online. Shuffle everything. Split the 1,000,000 images dataset into 980,000 for the training set, 10,000 for the dev set and 10,000 for the test set.

Q6. Assume you’ve finally chosen the following split between of the data:

Dataset:Contains:Error of the algorithm:
Training940,000 images randomly picked from (900,000 internet images + 60,000 car’s front-facing camera images)8.8%
Training-Dev20,000 images randomly picked from (900,000 internet images + 60,000 car’s front-facing camera images)9.1%
Dev20,000 images from your car’s front-facing camera14.3%
Test20,000 images from the car’s front-facing camera14.8%

You also know that human-level error on the road sign and traffic signals classification task is around 0.5%. Which of the following are True? (Check all that apply).

  • You have a large avoidable-bias problem because your training error is quite a bit higher than the human-level error.
  • You have a large variance problem because your model is not generalizing well to data from the same training distribution but that it has never seen before.
  • You have a large variance problem because your training error is quite higher than the human-level error.
  • You have a large data-mismatch problem because your model does a lot better on the training-dev set than on the dev set
  • Your algorithm overfits the dev set because the error of the dev and test sets are very close.

Q7. Based on the table from the previous question, a friend thinks that the training data distribution is much easier than the dev/test distribution. What do you think?

  • Your friend is right. (I.e., Bayes error for the training data distribution is probably lower than for the dev/test distribution.)
  • There’s insufficient information to tell if your friend is right or wrong.
  • Your friend is wrong. (I.e., Bayes error for the training data distribution is probably higher than for the dev/test distribution.)

Q8. You decide to focus on the dev set and check by hand what are the errors due to. Here is a table summarizing your discoveries:

Overall dev set error15.3%
Errors due to incorrectly labeled data4.1%
Errors due to foggy pictures8.0%
Errors due to rain drops stuck on your car’s front-facing camera2.2%
Errors due to other causes1.0%

In this table, 4.1%, 8.0%, etc. are a fraction of the total dev set (not just examples your algorithm mislabeled). For example, about 8.0/15.3 = 52% of your errors are due to foggy pictures.

The results from this analysis implies that the team’s highest priority should be to bring more foggy pictures into the training set so as to address the 8.0% of errors in that category. True/False?

Additional Note: there are subtle concepts to consider with this question, and you may find arguments for why some answers are also correct or incorrect. We recommend that you spend time reading the feedback for this quiz, to understand what issues that you will want to consider when you are building your own machine learning project.

  • True because it is the largest category of errors. We should always prioritize the largest category of error as this will make the best use of the team’s time.
  • True because it is greater than the other error categories added together (8.0 > 4.1+2.2+1.0).
  • False because it depends on how easy it is to add foggy data. If foggy data is very hard and costly to collect, it might not be worth the team’s effort.
  • First start with the sources of error that are least costly to fix.

Q9. You can buy a specially designed windshield wiper that help wipe off some of the raindrops on the front-facing camera. Based on the table from the previous question, which of the following statements do you agree with?

  • 2.2% would be a reasonable estimate of the maximum amount this windshield wiper could improve performance.
  • 2.2% would be a reasonable estimate of the minimum amount this windshield wiper could improve performance.
  • 2.2% would be a reasonable estimate of how much this windshield wiper will improve performance.
  • 2.2% would be a reasonable estimate of how much this windshield wiper could worsen performance in the worst case.

Q10. You decide to use data augmentation to address foggy images. You find 1,000 pictures of fog off the internet, and “add” them to clean images to synthesize foggy days, like this:

Which of the following statements do you agree with?

  • Adding synthesized images that look like real foggy pictures taken from the front-facing camera of your car to training dataset won’t help the model improve because it will introduce avoidable-bias.
  • So long as the synthesized fog looks realistic to the human eye, you can be confident that the synthesized data is accurately capturing the distribution of real foggy images (or a subset of it), since human vision is very accurate for the problem you’re solving.
  • There is little risk of overfitting to the 1,000 pictures of fog so long as you are combining it with a much larger (>>1,000) of clean/non-foggy images.

Q11. After working further on the problem, you’ve decided to correct the incorrectly labeled data on the dev set. Which of these statements do you agree with? (Check all that apply).

  • You should also correct the incorrectly labeled data in the test set, so that the dev and test sets continue to come from the same distribution.
  • You do not necessarily need to fix the incorrectly labeled data in the training set, because it’s okay for the training set distribution to differ from the dev and test sets. Note that it is important that the dev set and test set have the same distribution.
  • You should not correct the incorrectly labeled data in the test set, so that the dev and test sets continue to come from the same distribution.
  • You should correct incorrectly labeled data in the training set as well so as to avoid your training set now being even more different from your dev set.

Q12. So far your algorithm only recognizes red and green traffic lights. One of your colleagues in the startup is starting to work on recognizing a yellow traffic light. (Some countries call it an orange light rather than a yellow light; we’ll use the US convention of calling it yellow.) Images containing yellow lights are quite rare, and she doesn’t have enough data to build a good model. She hopes you can help her out using transfer learning.

What do you tell your colleague?

  • If she has (say) 10,000 images of yellow lights, randomly sample 10,000 images from your dataset and put your and her data together. This prevents your dataset from “swamping” the yellow lights dataset.
  • You cannot help her because the distribution of data you have is different from hers, and is also lacking the yellow label.
  • She should try using weights pre-trained on your dataset, and fine-tuning further with the yellow-light dataset.
  • Recommend that she try multi-task learning instead of transfer learning using all the data.

Q13. Another colleague wants to use microphones placed outside the car to better hear if there are other vehicles around you. For example, if there is a police vehicle behind you, you would be able to hear their siren. However, they don’t have much to train this audio system. How can you help?

  • Neither transfer learning nor multi-task learning seems promising.
  • Multi-task learning from your vision dataset could help your colleague get going faster. Transfer learning seems significantly less promising.
  • Either transfer learning or multi-task learning could help our colleague get going faster.
  • Transfer learning from your vision dataset could help your colleague get going faster. Multi-task learning seems significantly less promising.

Q14. To recognize red and green lights, you have been using this approach:

  1. (A) Input an image (x) to a neural network and have it directly learn a mapping to make a prediction as to whether there’s a red light and/or green light (y).
  2. A teammate proposes a different, two-step approach:
  3. (B) In this two-step approach, you would first (i) detect the traffic light in the image (if any), then (ii) determine the color of the illuminated lamp in the traffic light.
  4. Between these two, Approach B is more of an end-to-end approach because it has distinct steps for the input end and the output end. True/False?
  • True
  • False

Q15. Approach A (in the question above) tends to be more promising than approach B if you have a __ (fill in the blank).

  • Multi-task learning problem.
  • Problem with a high Bayes error.
  • Large bias problem.
  • Large training set

More About This Course

In the third Deep Learning Specialization course, you’ll learn how to design a successful machine learning project and practise decision-making.

By the conclusion, you’ll be able to diagnose mistakes in a machine learning system, prioritise tactics for minimising errors, grasp complex ML settings, such as mismatched training/test sets, and use end-to-end learning, transfer learning, and multi-task learning.

This is a single course for machine learning beginners. Andrew Ng’s experience constructing deep learning products informs this course. This course delivers “industry experience” that you might gain only after years of ML work experience if you wish to be a technical leader for an AI team.

The Deep Learning Specialization is a foundational program that teaches you deep learning’s capabilities, challenges, and repercussions and prepares you to develop cutting-edge AI. It teaches you how to use machine learning in your work, advance your technical career, and enter the AI industry.

SKILLS YOU WILL GAIN

  • Deep Learning
  • Inductive Transfer
  • Machine Learning
  • Multi-Task Learning
  • Decision-Making

Conclusion

Hopefully, this article will be useful for you to find all the Week, final assessment, and Peer Graded Assessment Answers of Structuring Machine Learning Projects Coursera Quiz of Coursera and grab some premium knowledge with less effort. If this article really helped you in any way then make sure to share it with your friends on social media and let them also know about this amazing training. You can also check out our other course Answers. So, be with us guys we will share a lot more free courses and their exam/quiz solutions also, and follow our Techno-RJ Blog for more updates.

Leave a Comment

Ads Blocker Image Powered by Code Help Pro

Ads Blocker Detected!!!

We have detected that you are using extensions to block ads. Please support us by disabling these ads blocker.

Powered By
Best Wordpress Adblock Detecting Plugin | CHP Adblock