Teach English Now! Second Language Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Coursera Quiz Answers 2023 [💯% Correct Answer]

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About Teach English Now! Second Language Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Course

In this course, you will learn about some of the challenges of teaching and learning to listen and speak, such as paralinguistics, performance variables, reduced and regional forms, and different types of oral discourse.

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Teach English Now! Second Language Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Quiz Answers

Week 1: Teach English Now! Second Language Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Welcome Guide

Q1. Who handles course content issues?

  • ASU
  • Coursera

Q2. Who handles technical issues?

  • Coursera
  • ASU

Q3. The deadlines are…

  • simply a guide.
  • simply a guide, except the last one at the end of the course.
  • to be followed exactly.

Q4. To alert your peers to review an assignment, you should…

  • post a request in Discussions.
  • post a request with a shareable link in Discussions.
  • do nothing.

Q5. In order to receive the 150 Hour TESOL certificate from ASU, you must…

  • successfully complete the course you are taking right now.
  • successfully complete Part 1.
  • successfully complete Parts 1 and 2.

Quiz 2: Checkpoint Quiz (5 Q’s)

Q1. What was one of Art Ticulate’s, the game show host, character flaws?

  • He listened too much and didn’t talk to others.
  • He didn’t like his mother-in-law.
  • He talked too much and didn’t listen to others.

Q2. Why were the losers’ prizes (twin babies and a trip with an angry mother-in -law) appropriate, according to Mr. Art Ticulate?

  • The losers’ prizes were intended to help improve their listening skills.
  • The losers’ prizes were intended to help improve their speaking skills.
  • The losers’ prizes were intended to help improve their reading skills.
  • The losers’ prizes were intended to help improve their grammar skills.

Q3. Reducing two or more words so that the SOUND of the words run together is called

  • A morphological reduction
  • Ellipses
  • A pragmatic reduction
  • Blending

Q4. When a phrase is left out in between two thoughts and the listener is asked to add in the missing details by predicting or relying on the context, this is called

  • Ellipses
  • A morphological reduction
  • A pragmatic reduction
  • Blending

Q5. Contractions, like “can’t” and “won’t,” are common examples of

  • Pragmatic reductions
  • Colloquialisms
  • Paralinguistic variables
  • Morphological reductions

Quiz 3: Checkpoint Quiz (5 Q’s)

Q1. In Video 3 about “What Makes Listening Hard,” the producers of the show have suggested that the host, Art Ticulate, make which changes? (Select all that are correct)

  • He should talk more.
  • He should allow guests time to study the information provided before he asks questions.
  • He should listen to what the guests have to say.
  • He should give everyone an equal chance to answer questions.
  • He should let the guests collaborate to find answers.
  • He should buy new clothes.

Q2. True or False: Teachers should teach students ABOUT language but never let students practice or use language.

  • True
  • False

Q3. What is the problem with teachers continuously focusing on winners and losers in the class?

  • This causes the students to speak and think too quickly.
  • This allows teachers to teach only vocabulary and grammar.
  • This demonstrates preferential treatment.

Q4. True or False: According to Video 4, the traditional-style lecture classroom encourages critical thinking and participation from students.

  • True
  • False

Q5. What are some features that teachers–especially new teachers–use that can make listening hard for learners? (Check all that apply)

  • Using idioms, regionalisms and slang.
  • Speaking too fast.
  • Speaking too low.
  • Speaking too slow.
  • Using reduced forms of words.

Quiz 4: Graded Checkpoint (10 Multiple Choice Questions)

Q1. Dr. Dixon’s example of his 2-year old’s speech, “Daddy! Read? Snuggle? Where’s blankie?” is an example of

  • a paralinguistic variable.
  • a pragmatic reduction.
  • a child’s need to be taught grammar.
  • slang usage

Q2. Which of the following are examples of paralinguistic variables? (Select all correct answers.)

  • Volume
  • Speed of speech
  • Gestures
  • An accent
  • Contractions

Q3. Which words below refer to informal speech that is not often used in writing and can often contain difficult to understand idiomatic expressions that must be taught one by one?

  • Fillers
  • Jargon
  • Colloquialisms
  • Slang

Q4. The vocabulary in all of the English-speaking countries is always exactly the same.

  • False
  • True

Q5. Select the examples of performance variables below:

  • “Wannaea’dinner?”
  • “Well….”
  • “Next week…..for sure.”
  • “Wait….”
  • “Um…..”

Q6. What are some of the challenges listening and speaking teachers face in the classroom? (Select all that apply)

  • Teachers fall victim to speaking clearly and using vocabulary aimed at the students’ level of comprehension.
  • A teacher’s focus on short term goals such as memorizing facts can become an impediment to language learning itself.
  • It is difficult to let everyone’s voice be heard, and it is easier for teachers to listen to the voices they prefer or listen to those teachers believe are smarter than others.
  • Teachers can be tricked into believing that class time is an opportunity for students to listen, and for a teacher to speak.

Q7. What are some forms of oral discourse discussed in this module? (Select all that apply)

  • Performance Variables
  • Monologues
  • Interactional Dialogues
  • Transactional Dialogues

Q8. Which feature of spoken language is used to increase the speed of conversation by simply leaving out already understood information?

  • Blending
  • Ellipses
  • Morphological Reductions
  • Pragmatic Reductions

Q9. True or False: It is easy to get students to share and collaborate in another language.

  • True
  • False

Q10. True or False: Listening is challenging for both students and teachers, but for different reasons.

  • True
  • False.

Week 2: Teach English Now! Second Language Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Checkpoint (5 Q’s)

Q1. According to the game show panelists, some strategies for dealing with a difficult lecture include recording the lecture and listening to it again later, sitting “up front and center” to get as much visual input as possible, and ____________.

  • Switching to a different class.
  • Note-taking.
  • Asking the professor to speak more slowly and use smaller words.
  • Paying another student to take notes for you.

Q2. Good listeners have a list of strategies they choose from at random to help them listen effectively.

  • True.
  • False.

Q3. In Video 2, how are “listening strategies” defined for the purposes of this course?

  • A listening strategy is one which helps a learner actively overcome some of the challenges that make listening hard, giving the learner a better chance at acquiring language.
  • A listening strategy is one which is based on the first language of the learner.
  • Note-taking and inferring from context.
  • Researchers do not agree on what a “strategy” might be in the context of listening.

Q4. What are three strategies a language learner might employ when unable to understand a social interaction?

  • Make a request for elaboration.
  • Leave the conversation immediately.
  • Make a request for clarification.
  • Take (mental or actual written) notes on which to request clarification or elaboration later (and thus avoid interrupting).
  • Ask the people in the interaction to please change the topic.

Q5. What is one reason mentioned in Video 2 that the Cornell Method particularly effective?

  • It requires learners to make requests for clarification.
  • It asks the learner to not only take notes in an organized and efficient way, but also use the metacognitive strategy of reviewing key points and summarizing the lecture after the note-taking.
  • It is much faster than other note-taking methods.
  • It was developed at Cornell, a very good university, so it must be good.

Quiz 2: Checkpoint (5 Q’s)

Q1. Teachers should not teach listening strategies, because knowing what good listeners do will not help lower-level learners.

  • False.
  • True.

Q2. When learners are given multiple opportunities to listen to an audio clip, they should be asked to perform the same, very general task each time they listen.

  • True.
  • False.

Q3. What did Art do, without realizing he was doing it, by giving the panelists some questions, asking them to think about them, having them read and explore the ideas, and then inviting them to share their thoughts and ideas at the guest panel?

  • He helped the panelists develop a greater sense of language awareness, thus increasing their ability to think of language in different ways and growing their language learning strategy repetoire.
  • He made the panelists very nervous.
  • He confused the panelists. He should have elicited answers from them before giving them the answers in order to truly challenge them to develop their language skills.

Q4. What three techniques can instructors use to enhance input and thus help students notice certain language features in a listening/speaking class?

  • Bolding or highlighting text that is spoken.
  • Using the teacher’s own voice in order to be able to emphasize the words or messages that need to be enhanced.
  • Not breaking things down for students as they listen to force them to improve their own listening skills.
  • Using visual cue cards (with vocabulary or context clues and information) to help students identify difficult vocabulary and follow along.
  • Writing key words on the board and inviting students to listen for them.

Q5. According to Video 4, an instructor’s job is ultimately to ______________.

  • Provide different paths and strategies so that students may approach listening in active and increasingly effective ways.
  • Start an audio, sit down, and leave students to their own devices.
  • Force students to develop their own individual strategies so that they do not copy the strategies of others.
  • Compare poor listeners to good listeners in order to motivate poor listeners to improve.

Quiz 3: Graded Checkpoint (10 Q’s)

Q1. “Listening strategies” is a concept that is easy to define.

  • True. “Listening strategies” are things learners do naturally and thus cannot be taught.
  • True. All researchers agree that a “listening strategy” is an effective method of note-taking.
  • False. Though definitions for “listening strategies” vary among researchers, we defined listening strategies as any techniques that learners use to overcome the difficulty of listening, including requests for elaboration, requests for clarification, and note-taking (among others).

Q2. Learners should always avoid risk when choosing a listening strategy.

  • True. Risk is scary, and can thus be demotivating for students.
  • False. All strategies involve some level of risk, but no one ever learned a language without taking some risks!

Q3. Recording a lecture in order to listen to it later (and thus avoid missing key information) is what kind of listening strategy?

  • Request for elaboration.
  • Attempt to slow things down to learn at one’s own pace.
  • Request for clarification.
  • Avoidance.

Q4. One strategy discussed involves connecting listening to reading and writing so that information is coming in through two channels – the audio channel and the visual channel. How do we propose learners connect listening to reading and writing?

  • By watching a lot of television.
  • By traveling to Oz and discussing different strategies with Dorothy (who clearly knows a thing or two about reading!).
  • Through effective note-taking, such as the Cornell Method of Note-taking.

Q5. Very general, open-ended questions and tasks are best for teaching listening skills.

  • True.
  • False.

Q6. What are three activities teachers can invite students to do before, during, or after listening to an audio?

  • Discuss or free-write about what they already know about the topic, then relax and listen for main ideas.
  • Play on their phones to achieve the “Listening Osmosis” effect.
  • Listen for specific details.
  • Take notes and then summarize the audio.

Q7. Discussing or free-writing about what they already know about a topic, then relaxing and listening for main ideas is an example of _________.

  • Critical thinking.
  • Bottom-up processing.
  • Top-down processing.
  • Middle ground processing.

Q8. Focusing learners’ attentions on specific questions or details while listening is an example of __________________.

  • Middle ground processing.
  • Top-down processing.
  • Bottom-up processing.
  • Critical thinking.

Q9. Is there any one strategy that EVERYONE (all teachers, researchers, and students) agree is the best strategy to develop listening skills?

  • No, but there is a wide consensus of some ways to effectively approach teaching listening in the ESL context.
  • Yes, most agree that bottom-up processing techniques are the most important skills a student can have.
  • Yes, most agree that top-down processing techniques are the most important skills a student can have.
  • No, most researchers, teachers, and students agree that listening is a “natural skill” and should thus not be taught at all.

Q10. Ultimately, a listening teacher’s job is to _______

  • Expose learners to as many different listening materials as possible.
  • Expose learners to all of her favorite songs.
  • Teach students bottom-up processing techniques.
  • Teach students top-down processing techniques.
  • Provide a variety of paths, techniques, and strategies for students to approach listening.

Week 3: Teach English Now! Second Language Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Checkpoint Quiz (5 Q’s)

Q1. Talking with Clara Fication makes our panelists very nervous! They probably would have a more relaxed attitude toward speaking if a different host joined the show. What effect is this an example of?

  • The 5-hour effect
  • The interaction effect
  • The interlocutor effect
  • The intensive speaking effect

Q2. You are explaining a concept to your students, when one of them raises their hand and asks a great question. However, in order to answer that question, you have to change what you were just planning to talk about. What effect is this an example of?

  • The intensive speaking effect
  • The interaction effect
  • The 5-hour problem
  • The interlocutor effect

Q3. Where does Jimmy ride his red bike?

  • To his new mother-in-law’s house for a donut
  • Far away from Clara Fication
  • What? Jimmy doesn’t have a red bike.
  • Through the mountains and hills of Minnesota

Q4. When students have to verbally respond to a timed prompt on the TOEFL test, what kind of speaking is this?

  • Interactive speaking
  • Intensive speaking
  • Responsive speaking
  • Imitative speaking

Q5. You notice your students speaking in English together as they leave class. They are having an authentic conversation, including turn-taking and interrupting. What kind of speaking is this?

  • Interactive speaking
  • Intensive speaking
  • Responsive speaking
  • Imitative speaking

Quiz 2: Checkpoint Quiz (5 Q’s)

Q1. Why might a teacher feel that a class is interactive when it really isn’t?

  • Some students monopolize the teacher’s time, limiting the amount of time others can speak.
  • When students talk in groups, they often do not talk on the topic the teacher gave them.
  • All of the above.
  • Students may speak in their native language, giving the illusion that they are speaking in English.

Q2. Between the interaction effect and the interlocutor effect, which does Adam think is more significant to him personally?

  • Neither are important to him.
  • The interaction effect is more important to him, because what he plans to say changes based on what his conversation partner says.
  • The interlocutor effect is more important to him, because he’s more inclined to speak if the person is friendly and it’s unsettling if they’re disagreeable.
  • They are equally important to him.

Q3. Which 2 kinds of speaking does Ashley think are more common in today’s modern TESOL classroom?

  • Intensive speaking
  • Interactive speaking
  • Imitative speaking
  • Responsive speaking

Q4. It is never appropriate to use intensive and imitative speaking activities in the classroom.

  • False.
  • True.

Q5. All teachers should be like Clara Fication and never tolerate errors in the language classroom.

  • False
  • True

Quiz 3: Graded Checkpoint (10 Multiple Choice Questions)

Q1. What is the 5-hour problem?

  • That the standard amount of time dedicated to language learning in most programs doesn’t give students enough exposure to language.
  • That teachers only have 5 hours per week to prepare their lessons.
  • That students only have 5 hours per week to do their homework.
  • That teachers have to be in meetings 5 hours per day.

Q2. Which 3 of the following are related to how easily a speaker’s emotions can be influenced by others?

  • Interlocutor effect
  • Affective factors (including environmental, linguistic, and academic factors)
  • Interaction effect
  • Intensive speaking

Q3. When students listen carefully and repeat exactly what a speaker says, what kind of speaking is this?

  • Intensive speaking
  • Imitative speaking
  • Interactive speaking
  • Responsive speaking

Q4. When a teacher listens to a student for the purpose of finding out how accurately the student can speak, what kind of speaking is this?

  • Intensive speaking
  • Imitative speaking
  • Interactive speaking
  • Responsive speaking

Q5. Your student will have to take the TOEFL next week. What kind of speaking will he/she engage in during the timed prompt?

  • Intensive speaking
  • Imitative speaking
  • Interactive speaking
  • Responsive speaking

Q6. You are going to meet a student for a conference about his grades. What kind of speaking will you two engage in?

  • Intensive speaking
  • Responsive speaking
  • Interactive speaking
  • Imitative speaking

Q7. Why does the Teach English Now! team prefer Adam and Ashley’s style of teaching to Clara Fication’s style of teaching? Choose 3 answers.

  • Because imitative speech and assessment are not important
  • Because it evokes a warm, inviting classroom atmosphere
  • Because it motivates learners
  • Because it stimulates critical thinking about the material

Q8. What is the illusion of interactivity?

  • Iva and Jimmy’s spectacular interactive magic show in Las Vegas.
  • Dr. Dixon’s one-man off-Broadway act.
  • When students seem to be speaking the target language a lot in class, but really they aren’t.
  • When two people are pretending to listen to each other talk, but they’re really thinking about something completely different.

Q9. When thinking back on different language approaches throughout the years, what kinds of speaking were most common in TESOL classrooms? Choose 2.

  • Interactive speaking
  • Imitative speaking
  • Intensive speaking
  • Responsive speaking

Q10. Adam says that imitative and intensive speaking activities have a place in the modern language classroom. What is his reasoning? Choose 2 answers.

  • Because otherwise it’s boring.
  • Because imitative and intensive speaking can give students, especially basic-level students, a valuable opportunity for practice.
  • Because teachers should have TOTAL CONTROL. TOTAL CONTROL!!
  • As discussed in the first specialization, we don’t want to swing too far to one side of the pendulum.

Week 4

Quiz 1 : Checkpoint (5 Q’s)

Q1. How do sociolinguists define the silent period?

  • an interval in which learners do not speak very much
  • a time in which the teacher requires learners to reflect on the lesson
  • a stage in which learners are unable or unwilling to speak

Q2. In which situation would overtraining be the correct strategy for a learner to choose?

  • a dinner with a native speaker
  • a presentation
  • a dialogue

Q3. When involved in a speaking activity, focus-on-meaning students tend to pay
attention to correct grammar and vocabulary choices but may speak less.

  • False
  • True

Q4. Which of the following speaking strategies do both focus-on-form and focus-on-meaning learners use? Choose the 4 correct answers.

  • improvising
  • preparing and practicing
  • physical response
  • visual imagery
  • memorizing vocabulary words
  • speaking with others

Q5. Why is it important for teachers to give
students a chance to perform or speak to others? Choose the 2 best answers.

  • to have students receive critical feedback
  • to embarrass students
  • to motivate students to do well
  • to fulfill the objectives of the course

Quiz 2: Checkpoint (5 Q’s)

Q1. What is language ego?

  • the “I” or self of any student
  • the idea that a student has of his/her level of
    language
  • the identity that the student has with reference to a language

Q2. What is the job of the teacher with regard to language ego? Choose the 2 correct
answers.

  • to dismiss their struggles with their new identity
  • to help students in relaxing and finding their new identity
  • to motivate students to be comfortable with their new identity

Q3. What are the strategies mentioned in Video #4 that a teacher can use to help students with expressing their new identities? Choose the 4 correct answers.

  • improvisation
  • questions
  • impossible tasks
  • noticing
  • authentic language
  • feedback

Q4. What kind of classroom space would be ideal for helping students to want to speak?

  • a classroom that has color, posters, books, and samples
    of student work
  • a classroom with clean, white walls and well-maintained desks
  • a classroom that has nicely painted walls, a few posters, and a few books

Q5. Shane described in Video #4 how he gave his basic students an impossible task. Why did he do that?

  • to challenge and motivate them
  • to intimidate them
  • to show them that they needed to study harder

Quiz 3: Graded Checkpoint (10 Q’s)

Q1. Good language learners have a tendency to prepare and practice more than other language learners.

  • False
  • True

Q2. Even if learners approach a task differently, they can use the same general
strategies regardless of their personalities or personal learning style
preferences.

  • False
  • True

Q3. What are some techniques associated with the
concept of imagery? Choose the 4 correct answers.

  • pictures
  • mnemonic devices
  • overtraining
  • mind palaces
  • preparation
  • images

Q4. What is interactivity?

  • acting between two people
  • speaking with others
  • having a relationship with another person

Q5. Why is interactivity one of the keys to improving speaking skills? Choose the 3 best answers.

  • Because it helps to improve students’ English in general.
  • Because critical feedback can be given.
  • Because it helps create relationships.
  • Because it involves risk-taking.
  • Because it helps students to focus on the task.

Q6. It is not necessary for teachers to help students express their new identities.

  • True
  • False

Q7. What kinds of questions will help students to speak up in class? Choose the 3 correct answers.

  • questions that make students uncomfortable
  • questions that allow students to express their thoughts
  • questions that have a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ answer
  • questions about students likes and dislikes
  • questions that require critical thinking

Q8. Why is it important to give students tasks that allow them to use authentic language? Choose the 2 correct answers.

  • Because it will better engage students in the tasks.
  • Because it fulfills the outcomes of the course.
  • Because it is motivating to students.

Q9. Which classroom is the ideal classroom to help motivate students to speak?

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Q10. According to Shane, impossible tasks are truly impossible and should be avoided in the classroom.

  • True
  • False

Week 5: Teach English Now! Second Language Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Checkpoint (5 Q’s)

Q1. Language ego is…

  • the idea that some languages are more prestigious than others
  • the name of Clara Fication’s early 90s punk rock band
  • not an important concept when considering how to teach pronunciation
  • the idea that personal identity and language are interconnected

Q2. What factors might affect students’ pronunciation in English? Check all that apply.

  • intelligence
  • intonation & stress
  • 1st language
  • language ego
  • age
  • innate phonetic ability

Q3. What does “intonation” refer to? What does “stress” refer to?

  • emphasis on different syllables within a word or phrase; variations in pitch
  • variations in pitch; emphasis on different syllables within a word or phrase

Q4. anjoo” (for “And you”), and “somethin’” are examples of which linguistic phenomenon?

  • reductions
  • laziness and corruption of the English language
  • paralinguistic elements
  • regionalisms

Q5. Which of these questions should teachers consider when deciding how to teach pronunciation? Check all that apply.

  • Are pronunciation and identity connected?
  • What factors might affect my students’ pronunciation in English?
  • Should a certain accent be taught in the classroom?
  • Is our goal as language teachers to remove accent from the first language entirely or to improve intelligibility?

Quiz 2: Checkpoint (5 Q’s)

Q1. What 3-step model for pronunciation does Niall use in his classroom?

  • identify, judge, fail
  • identify, produce, compare
  • point, laugh, ridicule
  • compare, identify, produce

Q2. An error that causes interference with meaning is known as a…

  • global error
  • local error

Q3. An error that is minor and doesn’t interfere with meaning is known as a…

  • global error
  • local error

Q4. What is monitoring?

  • What Clara and Art have to undergo as part of their intensive therapy treatment
  • When the teacher watches students do their pair work together
  • When the teacher hovers over a student while they speak
  • When students learn to recognize and correct their own errors

Q5. The linguistic term for two words that are nearly identical except for one key sound is…

  • minimal pairs
  • maximal pairs
  • minimum pairs
  • maximum pairs

Quiz 3: Graded Checkpoint (10 Q’s)

Q1. In the field of education, what does the concept of “recycling” refer to?

  • discussing information that was previously covered
  • using your lesson plans over and over again
  • when students have to take a course more than one time
  • a sustainable approach to getting rid of your students’ work

Q2. Elements that are considered OUTSIDE of normal linguistic elements are known as…

  • paralinguistic elements
  • exolinguistic elements
  • ultralinguistic elements
  • external linguistic elements

Q3. Many language learners don’t want to give up their accent because their accents are representative of their identities. What linguistic concept is this?

  • prestige accent
  • language prestige
  • language ego
  • personal ego

Q4. Dr. Dixon stated that pronunciation is multifaceted — there are a lot of factors that affect it! Which of the following factors might influence learners’ pronunciation in a new language? Choose all that apply.

  • reductions
  • intonation
  • prestige accents
  • innate phonetic ability
  • regionalisms
  • language ego
  • age
  • 1st language
  • intelligence
  • stress

Q5. Two types of reductions are (1) assimilations and (2) lexical elisions. What does each term mean?

  • Lexical elisions are when sounds change and blend together. Assimilations are when speakers drop sounds in the middle or at the end of words.
  • Assimilations are when sounds change and blend together. Lexical elisions are when speakers drop sounds in the middle or at the end of words.

Q6. When learners start noticing and correcting their own mistakes, what is this referred to as?

  • recycling
  • monitoring
  • reusing
  • reducing

Q7. Ways to practice pronunciation include… (Check all that apply.)

  • articulation activities
  • tongue twisters
  • analyzing examples of reduced speech forms
  • discussing written v. spoken language
  • dialogues

Q8. What is the difference between a global and a local error?

  • A local error is an error that affects meaning, and a global error is one that does not.
  • A global error is one that speakers all over the world make, and a local error is one that is made by speakers in a particular area of the world.
  • A global error is when the error affects meaning, and a local error is when it doesn’t.
  • A global error is when a speaker makes the error in an international setting, and a local error is when the speaker makes an error in his home setting.

Q9. What is spot correction?

  • When a student recognizes his mistake and fixes it
  • When a teacher makes a decision on the spot to correct a student later
  • When a teacher corrects the student’s dog
  • When a teacher corrects a student at the time the error is made

Q10. You are working on pronunciation with your students. First, you choose a sound which many students are struggling with. Then, you have students listen to sentences with minimal pairs containing that sound. Finally, you have students use tongue twisters with that sound. What strategy did you just use?

  • produce, identify, compare
  • compare, identify, produce
  • identify, produce, compare
  • compare, produce, identify

Week 6: Teach English Now! Second Language Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Quiz Answers

Quiz 1: Final Checkpoint (25 questions)

Q1. Which of the following are examples of paralinguistic variables? (Select all correct answers.)

  • Speed of speech
  • An accent
  • Contractions
  • Gestures
  • Volume

Q2. When a phrase is left out in between two thoughts and the listener is asked to add in the missing details by predicting or relying on the context, this is called

  • Ellipses
  • Blending
  • A morphological reduction
  • A pragmatic reduction

Q3. What are some features that teachers–especially new teachers–use that can make listening hard for learners? (Check all that apply)

  • Speaking too fast.
  • Enunciating clearly and speaking clearly
  • Speaking too slow.
  • Using idioms, regionalisms and slang.
  • Speaking too low.

Q4. Fillers and redundancies are examples of performance variables.

  • True
  • False

Q5. Examples below demonstrates the concept of “blending?”

  • Couldn’t
  • I can’t…..busy.
  • Hey! Eat? Soon?
  • Idonwanna.

Q6. Which options are strategies learners can use to improve their own listening skills? Select all that apply.

  • Continually disrupt the speaker to ask for more information.
  • Request for elaboration
  • Request for clarification
  • Wait until another, more appropriate time to seek clarification

Q7. What is the term used for when learners start noticing and correcting their own mistakes?

  • Reducing
  • Monitoring
  • Recycling
  • Pronunciation
  • Reusing

Q8. Which note taking style was discussed in which learners took notes about details of a lecture in class, reviewed notes after class and wrote key points, and finally wrote a summary of the notes?

  • The Cornell Method
  • The Metacognative Method
  • The Listening Method

Q9. True or False: Teachers should view listening activities as a time where the teacher simply starts an audio
recording, sit down, and let students alone.

  • True.
  • False

Q10. Which listening process requires listeners to focus on details or a specific part of a listening passage?

  • Bottom up process
  • Top down process

Q11. How are classroom size and the 5-hour problem related?

  • They both limit interaction in a classroom.
  • They both have a positive influence on how students feel and behave.
  • They are not related.

Q12. When students are required to produce short segments of language that demonstrate grammatical, lexical and/or phonologice accuracy, what kind of speaking is this?

  • Responsive speaking
  • Imitative speaking
  • Intensive speaking
  • Interactive speaking

Q13. What are positive or negative emotions which influence a person’s ability to speak?

  • Affective Factors
  • The Interlocuter Effect
  • The Interaction Effect
  • Responsivve Speaking

Q14. True or False: It is never appropriate to use intensive and imitative speaking activities in the classroom.

  • True.
  • False.

Q15. What was the purpose of mentioning the phrase, “You can’t tell the storm under the surface” in relation to teaching language learners? Select all that apply

  • When students speak, they have a lot going in on their minds, such as focusing on their grammar and pronunciation, in addition to the ideas they’re sharing.
  • As teachers, we often do not know what’s going on in our students’ minds.
  • Teachers should take into consideration that social cues demand pleasantness so speakers are required to appear calm and happy, even when inside, they are managing all kinds of pressure.

Q16. Which students typically speak more in language courses?

  • Students who focus on how they they say things: the “focus-on-form” students.
  • Students who focus on what they’re saying: the “focus-on-meaning” students.

Q17. Which speaking strategies were discussed in Module 4?

  • Physical Response
  • Imitative speaking
  • Imagery
  • Preparation
  • Responsive speaking
  • Practice

Q18. How do sociolinguists define the silent period?

  • a stage in which learners are unable or unwilling to speak
  • an interval in which learners do not speak very much
  • a time in which the teacher requires learners to reflect on the lesson

Q19. True or False: Teachers should NEVER elicit imitative, intensive or responsive speech in their classrooms.

  • True
  • False

Q20. What are some techniques associated with the concept of imagery? Choose the correct answers.

  • Pictures
  • Mnemonic devices
  • Overtraining
  • Preparation
  • Mind palaces
  • Images

Q21. What are some of the variables that make second language pronunciation difficult, thereby producing significant accents?

  • Reductions
  • First language
  • Paralinguistics
  • Innate phonetic ability
  • Age

Q22. Which of these questions should teachers consider when deciding how to teach pronunciation? Check all that apply.

  • What is the meaning of life?
  • Is our goal as language teachers to remove accent from the first language entirely or to improve intelligibility?
  • What factors might affect my students’ pronunciation in English?
  • Should a certain accent be taught in the classroom?
  • Are pronunciation and identity connected?

Q23. According to the information in Module 5, which accent would be a “prestige accent” in the United States.

  • An Irish Accent
  • An American Accent

Q24. An error that causes interference with meaning is known as a

  • Global Error
  • Local Error

Q25. What are some techniques teachers can use to make listening easier for students?

  • Pause listening passages periodically to discuss and simplify meaning.
  • Ask students comprehension questions
  • Speed up listening passages to increase the rate of speaking.
  • Encourage students to ask their own questions.

We will Update These Answers Soon.

More About This Course

In this course, you will learn about some of the challenges of teaching and learning to listen and speak, such as paralinguistics, performance variables, reduced and regional forms, and different types of oral discourse.

Don’t worry—you’ll learn what those mean, too! Then you’ll learn how to make it easier for your students to learn how to listen and speak.

The course also talks about how powerful it can be to teach pronunciation in both listening and speaking classes and gives ideas for how to do this.

This course is part of a few different plans.

This course can be used for more than one Specialization or Professional Certificate. If you finish this course, it will help you learn in any of the following programs:

  • Arizona State University Professional Certificate in TESOL
  • Part 2 of the TESOL Certificate: Teach English Right Now! Specialization

SKILLS YOU WILL GAIN

  • Teaching
  • English Language
  • Lesson Plan
  • Speech

Conclusion

Hopefully, this article will be useful for you to find all the Week, final assessment, and Peer Graded Assessment Answers of Teach English Now! Second Language Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Quiz of Coursera and grab some premium knowledge with less effort. If this article really helped you in any way then make sure to share it with your friends on social media and let them also know about this amazing training. You can also check out our other course Answers. So, be with us guys we will share a lot more free courses and their exam/quiz solutions also, and follow our Techno-RJ Blog for more updates.

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