Speaking to persuade: Motivating audiences with solid arguments and moving language Coursera Quiz Answers 2022 | All Weeks Assessment Answers [💯Correct Answer]

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About Speaking to persuade: Motivating audiences with solid arguments and moving language Course

In the world of work, it is essential that we are able to debate one another without becoming combative. You are always making arguments, whether you are soliciting donations for a charitable organisation, presenting a business idea, or advocating a modification to an existing company policy. In order to effectively make the case for your topic, you will typically want to do a number of things, like raise awareness, establish an urgent problem, explain appropriate remedies, and lay out specific measures for the audience.

You need to be clear (since the audience may have very little or no prior information), you need to be convincing (because you are attempting to convince the audience that your argument is correct), and you need to be compelling in order to be persuasive (you are trying to motivate the audience enough so that they want to take specific actions). Speaking in a way that is persuasive therefore calls for clarity, strategy, and command of the subject matter, in addition to a sense of style and presence.

At the conclusion of this class, you should have the ability to compose persuasive speeches that discuss issues and potential solutions, as well as that motivate members of an audience. It is expected of you to be able to deliberately employ rhetorical style, as well as produce speeches that are both impassioned and compelling. Learners will record their speeches and then provide and receive feedback from their peers.

Course Apply Link – Speaking to persuade: Motivating audiences with solid arguments and moving language

Speaking to persuade: Motivating audiences with solid arguments and moving language Quiz Answers

Week 01

Practice Quiz: Persuasion

Q1. What are Aristotle’s three proofs?

  • Ethos, pathos, logos
  • Low, middle, high
  • Coercion, manipulation, and persuasion

Q2. A local city council is discussing whether or not to build a new civic center. This is primarily a debate over…

  • Policy
  • Value
  • Fact

Q3. You and your friends having been sitting around the house all day. You have had it. You look at your friends on the couch and say, “Let’s go out to eat!” In this case, you are arguing _____ the status quo and therefore you _____ the burden of proof.

  • against; don’t have
  • for; have
  • against; have
  • for; don’t have

Main : one quiz

Q1. Let’s say you’re trying to raise awareness (and maybe some money) for your youth chess program. You help students develop a love for chess after school. You were able to land a speaking position at a local business mixer, and there will be some drinks, socializing, and networking. You want to persuade people to help you out.

The elaboration likelihood model here provides some direction. What type of scenario is this and how will people probably process your message?

  • High elaboration. People will process your message centrally.
  • High elaboration. People will process your message peripherally.
  • Low elaboration. People will process your message centrally.
  • Low elaboration. People will process your message peripherally.

Q2. “What should we do?” This is a question of:

  • Fact
  • Policy
  • Value

Q3. Which statement is true of the “burden of proof”?

  • It’s always the most effective stasis point to argue.
  • It’s the stock issue that comes immediately after “blame.”
  • It’s yours if you are arguing against change.
  • It’s yours if you are arguing for change.

Q4. Identify the stock issues.

  • Satus quo, pro, con
  • Ill, blame, cure, consequences
  • Logos, pathos, ethos
  • Introduction, problem, solution, call to action

Q5. Typically we want to show both the _______________ aspects of our ill.

  • quantitative and qualitative
  • distant and present
  • short term and long term

Week 02

Practice Quiz: Persuasive arrangement

Q1. While the explicitness of the arrangement might vary based on the audience, your audience should probably be able to answer these questions.

  • Who is the most suitable expert to assess the ill? When should this happen?
  • How long has the ill been around? Has the blame been publicly identified?
  • What are the ills, blames, and cures? What can we do to help with the cures?

Q2. Argumentative congruency means that the argumentative elements _____________.

  • all run for the same amount of time
  • work well together
  • fit within the allotted time

Q3. Cures and calls to action are always different.

  • True
  • False

Argument tactics

Q1. We want stories in our speeches. But we want them to be doing stuff for our argument. In this way, we typically want stories to __________________.

  • show and prove
  • delight and entertain
  • delight and distract

Q2. We want to balance stories with facts, statistics, and testimony to show that the story is_____________________.

  • generalizable
  • true

Q3. When you want to validate your interpretation of an issue (e.g., showing that a blame is causing the ill), you should probably use some _____________.

  • expert testimony
  • statistics
  • stories

Main : two quiz

Q1. As discussed, calls to action should:

1 point

  • advance the cure.
  • always include a letter to a legislative body or policy maker.
  • be introduced before addressing the blame.
  • solve for the ill regardless of blame.

Q2. Select the most pressing problem (as discussed in the lectures) with the outline below.I.

I. lls

A. At-home daycares are popular

B. At-home daycares are poorly supervised

II. Blames

A. Many municipalities have lax legislation regarding at-home daycares

B. Many municipalities enforce existing policies ineffectively

III. Cures

A. We need to make sure that children are not in illegal at-home daycares

B. At-home daycares should be less popular

  • The ills are not significant
  • The speech is three points
  • The cures don’t solve for the blames

Q3. Identify the best and most congruent cures to complete the outline below.

I. Ill

A. Exploding milk cartons affect thousands of Canadians each year

B. Exploding milk cartons can cause devastating injuries

II. Blame

A. We currently have weak legislation governing the production of milk cartons

B. The public remains relatively unaware of the lurking threat of exploding milk cartons

III. Cure

A._________

B._________

C. If you don’t want to expire, check the expiration date

  • IIIA: We need to protect Canadian citizens

IIIB: We need to support hospital funding to deal with milk related injuries

  • IIIA: We must pass stricter regulation that reduces exploding milk cartons

IIIB: We need to support educational organizations like Moove On and NoBoomCow to get the word out

  • IIIA: We need to eliminate the problem at its source and get rid of dairy cows

IIIB: We need to support educational organizations like Moove On and NoBoomCow to get the word out

  • IIIA: We must pass stricter regulation that reduces exploding milk cartons

IIIB: We need to support hospital funding to deal with milk related injuries

Q4. Illon works at a tech company. Right now, the company is split, with many wanting to take the company public and allow for it to be publicly traded and others wanting to keep it a private company. Illon has a proposal for a new marketing campaign. Problem is, it’s been swept up in this larger debate. Those opposed to the public-option think opening the company to public trade would cause the organization to lose its character. The campaign is actually neutral on this question. Illon needs to get a vote on his new campaign in order to move forward. How might he respond to this situation?

  • Contain his argument. Try to show that the marketing campaign has nothing to do with the larger debate.
  • Attack those in favor of the private option. Try to show that marketing campaign isn’t linked to the private option by attacking that side.
  • Attack those in favor of the public option. Try to show that marketing campaign isn’t linked to the public option by attacking that side

Q5. Sophia is about to argue for a policy in front of her community council. She wants the council to increase city penalties for putting recyclable materials in the garbage. Right now, she argues, too many people put their recycling in the garbage. She is arguing that raising the fine from €50 to €100 will significantly improve the recycling rate, but she worries that the council won’t take her argument seriously since she is a computer programmer. What should she include to counter this concern?

Published testimony from a recycling policy expert showing the positive effects of higher fines on recycling rates.

  • An interview with her neighbors who agree that higher fines would help increase recycling rates.
  • A list of other cities and counties with fines above €50.
  • A story about a community that moved to better recycling through public information and fines.

Week 03

Practice Quiz : Fallacies

Q1. Which is the most accurate definition of a fallacy?

  • Fallacies are effective lies in communication.
  • Fallacies are deficient moves in argumentative discourse.
  • Fallacies are communication tactics that emerge from the speaker’s desire to avoid certain topics.

Q2. In a slippery slope fallacy, the speaker:

  • raises a distracting argument.
  • identifies a chain of events, but doesn’t prove the individual steps.
  • mistakes a chronological sequence of events for a causal one.

Q3. “If you believe in putting a sales tax on candy, you must hate children having any sense of joy in their lives.” This is best described an example of:

  • straw argument.
  • slippery slope.
  • false dilemma.
  • begging the question.

Style

Q1. Which of the following is the best example of alliteration?

  • Let us go forth to lead the land we love. (John F. Kennedy)
  • Let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. (Franklin D. Roosevelt)
  • Never could I have hoped for such great woe. (Aeneid)
  • Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, This was their finest hour. (Winston Churchill)

Q2. Which of the following is the best example of asyndeton?

  • One question I’ve been repeatedly asked these past few weeks is, How do I want to be remembered? My answer has been simple: to be remembered at all is pretty special. (Cal Ripkin Jr.)
  • Much of what I say might sound bitter, but it’s the truth. Much of what I say might sound like it’s stirring up trouble, but it’s the truth. Much of what I say might sound like it is hate, but it’s the truth. (Malcolm X).
  • We must change that deleterious environment of the 80’s, that environment which was characterized by greed and hatred and selfishness and mega-mergers and debt overhang…. (Barbara Jordan)
  • Veni, vidi, vici (Caesar: “I came; I saw; I conquered”)

Q3. We talked about antimetabole as a form of antithesis. Which of the following is the correct phrase structure for antimetabole?

  • AAAB
  • ABBA
  • BBAA

Main : three Quiz

Q1. “Low accountability in schools produces bad students. It stands to reason. When I look at school test scores and see poor results. I know it means one thing: that school isn’t being held accountable enough.” This is best described an example of:

  • Slippery Slope
  • Begging the question
  • Red herring
  • Straw argument

Q2. Read the exchange below and then answer the question.

(1) Amuro: I saw some cartoons this morning and they were so violent. That type of violence should be regulated so that children don’t mimic such violent behavior. The government must censor children’s television because limiting children’s exposure to certain ideas and images is the government’s role.

(2) Kai: You are assuming that the government can do a lot by controlling what’s on TV. Beyond the issue of censorship lies a problem of practicality.

(3) Amuro: According to your argument, we should allow graphic violence to run during Saturday morning cartoons, showing horror films to 4 year olds. Young children shouldn’t be subjected to such nightmarish images.

(4) Kai: But if such restrictions on children’s television become commonplace, then we will see similar restrictions popping up in adult programming, and then the government will start editing out content from the news.

(5) Amuro: I’m not suggesting that, but I do think that censoring cartoons is in the public interest. Look at Canada. They put restrictions on violent Saturday morning cartoons in 1991 and by 1997 the crime rate had dropped 15%.

(6) Kai: That’s stupid. How can you even think that? What’s wrong with you?

Which one of the above passages best exemplifies a straw argument?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6

Q3. Read the exchange below and then answer the question.

(1) Amuro: I saw some cartoons this morning and they were so violent. That type of violence should be regulated so that children don’t mimic such violent behavior. The government must censor children’s television because limiting children’s exposure to certain ideas and images is the government’s role.

(2) Kai: You are assuming that the government can do a lot by controlling what’s on TV. Beyond the issue of censorship lies a problem of practicality.

(3) Amuro: According to your argument, we should allow graphic violence to run during Saturday morning cartoons, showing horror films to 4-year-olds. Young children shouldn’t be subjected to such nightmarish images.

(4) Kai: But if such restrictions on children’s television become commonplace, then we will see similar restrictions popping up in adult programming, and then the government will start editing out content from the news.

(5) Amuro: I’m not suggesting that, but I do think that censoring cartoons is in the public interest. Look at Canada. They put restrictions on violent Saturday morning cartoons in 1991 and by 1997 the crime rate had dropped 15%.

(6) Kai: That’s stupid. How can you even think that? What’s wrong with you?

Which one of the following passages best exemplifies a post hoc fallacy?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6

Q4. In speech writing, a frame is a:

  • structure for interpretation and meaning-making.
  • a subtle fallacy that we don’t want the audience to catch.
  • statement against the status quo.
  • the stock issue that deals with feasibility.

Q5. Which of the following is the best example of epistrophe?

  • We shall meet again before long to march together to the redemption of our brothers who are still slaves of the stranger. We shall meet again before long to march to new triumphs. (Giuseppe Garibaldi)
  • When a great national calamity stares us in the face, we are, I fear, too much given to depending on a short campaign of education to do on the hustings what should have been accomplished in the schoolroom. (Booker T. Washington)
  • With this faith, we will be able to work together, pray together, struggle together, go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day. (Martin Luther King)
  • Without a healthy economy, we can’t have a healthy society and without a healthy society, the economy won’t stay healthy for long. (Margaret Thatcher)

Week 04

Practice Quiz: Um

Q1. “Ums” usually indicate a _____________.

  • lag in speech production
  • gap in content knowledge
  • lie in speech content

Q2. Ums are always distracting

  • False
  • True

Q3. Which of the techniques below were discussed for reducing ums?

  • Medication
  • Metronomes
  • Reading your manuscript verbatim
  • Decreased speech rate
  • Having go-to filler phrases

Main: four quiz

Q1. Listen to the following clip (a reading from Napoleon’s 1814 “Farwell to the Old Guard”). Identify the dominant problem.

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  • The intonation was too regular. He sounded sing-songy.
  • There were too many disfluencies. He said um too many times.
  • The pace was too rapid. He spoke too fast.

Q2. Disfluencies like ‘um’ are a natural part of speech and can help listeners.

  • True
  • False

Q3. Typically, when we have an um it signals that we

  • forgot what we were going to say (memory error).
  • need more time to figure out what we’re saying (production lag).
  • realized that we just said something false (truth error).

Q4. Which of the three techniques below did we discuss for reducing disfluencies?

  • Decreased speaking rate
  • Habit reversal training
  • Metronomes
  • Shock training
  • Reducing speech formality
  • Vocal warm-ups

Q5. Let’s say you’re speaking to an audience of 35 people. How long would you want to maintain eye contact? Each eye contact event should last about…

  • 5 sentences.
  • 20 seconds.
  • A sentence.
  • 3 seconds.
  • A phrase-length.
  • A word.

Conclusion

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